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Found 63 result(s)
In February 1986 the NIST measurements were communicated to appropriate astronomers for use in ground-based testing and calibration programs for the GHRS, and in 1990 the NIST group published the new wavelengths for about 3000 lines in the Supplement Series of the Astrophysical Journal. The full report on the NIST measurements in the form of a complete and detailed atlas of the platinum/neon spectrum presented in this special issue of the Journal of Research of NIST will be highly useful to a wide range of scientists.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) is a permanent archive and distribution center primarily for multiple types of digital data relating to earthquakes in central and northern California. The NCEDC is located at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, and has been accessible to users via the Internet since mid-1992. The NCEDC was formed as a joint project of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at Menlo Park in 1991, and current USGS funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for seismic network operations.
Scholars' Bank is the open access repository for the intellectual work of faculty, students and staff at the University of Oregon and partner institution collections.
SeaBASS, the publicly shared archive of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data maintained by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG). High quality in situ measurements are prerequisite for satellite data product validation, algorithm development, and many climate-related inquiries. As such, the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) maintains a local repository of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data to support their regular scientific analyses. The SeaWiFS Project originally developed this system, SeaBASS, to catalog radiometric and phytoplankton pigment data used their calibration and validation activities. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, SeaBASS was expanded with oceanographic and atmospheric data collected by participants in the SIMBIOS Program, under NASA Research Announcements NRA-96 and NRA-99, which has aided considerably in minimizing spatial bias and maximizing data acquisition rates. Archived data include measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties, phytoplankton pigment concentrations, and other related oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as water temperature, salinity, stimulated fluorescence, and aerosol optical thickness. Data are collected using a number of different instrument packages, such as profilers, buoys, and hand-held instruments, and manufacturers on a variety of platforms, including ships and moorings.
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The Human Genetic Variation Database (HGVD) aims to provide a central resource to archive and display Japanese genetic variation and association between the variation and transcription level of genes. The database currently contains genetic variations determined by exome sequencing of 1,208 individuals and genotyping data of common variations obtained from a cohort of 3,248 individuals.
HyperLeda is an information system for astronomy: It consists in a database and tools to process that data according to the user's requirements. The scientific goal which motivates the development of HyperLeda is the study of the physics and evolution of galaxies. LEDA was created more than 20 years ago, in 1983, and became HyperLeda after the merging with Hypercat in 2000
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).
The European Union Open Data Portal is the single point of access to a growing range of data from the institutions and other bodies of the European Union (EU). Data are free for you to use and reuse for commercial or non-commercial purposes. By providing easy and free access to data, the portal aims to promote their innovative use and unleash their economic potential. It also aims to help foster the transparency and the accountability of the institutions and other bodies of the EU. The EU Open Data Portal is managed by the Publications Office of the European Union. Implementation of the EU's open data policy is the responsibility of the Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology of the European Commission.
The GOES Space Environment Monitor archive is an important component of the National Space Weather Program --a interagency program to provide timely and reliable space environment observations and forecasts. GOES satellites carry onboard a Space Environment Monitor subsystem that measures X-rays, Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field at the Spacecraft.
As with most biomedical databases, the first step is to identify relevant data from the research community. The Monarch Initiative is focused primarily on phenotype-related resources. We bring in data associated with those phenotypes so that our users can begin to make connections among other biological entities of interest. We import data from a variety of data sources. With many resources integrated into a single database, we can join across the various data sources to produce integrated views. We have started with the big players including ClinVar and OMIM, but are equally interested in boutique databases. You can learn more about the sources of data that populate our system from our data sources page https://monarchinitiative.org/about/sources.
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
The repository is no longer available. <<<!!!<<< Selected TOXMAP data can be accesse from the following sites: U.S. EPA Toxics Release Program (TRI) (https://www.epa.gov/toxics-release-inventory-tri-program) U.S. EPA Superfund Program (https://www.epa.gov/superfund) U.S. EPA Facilities Registry System (FRS) (https://www.epa.gov/frs) U.S. EPA Clean Air Markets Program (https://www.epa.gov/airmarkets) U.S. EPA Geospatial Applications (https://www.epa.gov/geospatial/epa-geospatial-applications) U.S. NIH NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) (https://seer.cancer.gov/) Government of Canada National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) (https://www.canada.ca/en/services/environment/pollution-waste-management/national-pollutant-release-inventory.html) U.S. Census Bureau (https://www.census.gov/) U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) (https://www.nrc.gov/) >>>!!!>>>
>>>!!!<<< 2018-01-18: no data nor programs can be found >>>!!!<<< These archives contain public domain programs for calculations in physics and other programs that we suppose about will help during work with computer. Physical constants and experimental or theoretical data as cross sections, rate constants, swarm parameters, etc., that are necessary for physical calculations are stored here, too. Programs are mainly dedicated to computers compatible with PC IBM. If programs do not use graphic units it is possible to use them on other computers, too. It is necessary to reprogram the graphic parts of programs in the other cases.
CorrDB has data of cattle, relating to meat production, milk production, growth, health, and others. This database is designed to collect all published livestock genetic/phenotypic trait correlation data, aimed at facilitating genetic network analysis or systems biology studies.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
Socrata’s cloud-based solution allows government organizations to put their data online, make data-driven decisions, operate more efficiently, and share insights with citizens.
The Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR) consists of a new panel of over 1700 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Drosophila melanogaster, derived from two highly recombined synthetic populations, each created by intercrossing a different set of 8 inbred founder lines (with one founder line common to both populations). Complete genome sequence data for the founder lines are available, and in addition, there is a high resolution genetic map for each RIL. The DSPR has been developed as a community resource for high-resolution QTL mapping and is intended to be used widely by the Drosophila community.
Clinical Genomic Database (CGD) is a manually curated database of conditions with known genetic causes, focusing on medically significant genetic data with available interventions.
CODEX is a database of NGS mouse and human experiments. Although, the main focus of CODEX is Haematopoiesis and Embryonic systems, the database includes a large variety of cell types. In addition to the publically available data, CODEX also includes a private site hosting non-published data. CODEX provides access to processed and curated NGS experiments. To use CODEX: (i) select a specialized repository (HAEMCODE or ESCODE) or choose the whole compendium (CODEX), then (ii) filter by organism and (iii) choose how to explore the database.
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.