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Found 31 result(s)
In February 1986 the NIST measurements were communicated to appropriate astronomers for use in ground-based testing and calibration programs for the GHRS, and in 1990 the NIST group published the new wavelengths for about 3000 lines in the Supplement Series of the Astrophysical Journal. The full report on the NIST measurements in the form of a complete and detailed atlas of the platinum/neon spectrum presented in this special issue of the Journal of Research of NIST will be highly useful to a wide range of scientists.
The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) is a permanent archive and distribution center primarily for multiple types of digital data relating to earthquakes in central and northern California. The NCEDC is located at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, and has been accessible to users via the Internet since mid-1992. The NCEDC was formed as a joint project of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at Menlo Park in 1991, and current USGS funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for seismic network operations.
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
The Data Catalogue is a service that allows University of Liverpool Researchers to create records of information about their finalised research data, and save those data in a secure online environment. The Data Catalogue provides a good means of making that data available in a structured way, in a form that can be discovered by both general search engines and academic search tools. There are two types of record that can be created in the Data Catalogue: A discovery-only record – in these cases, the research data may be held somewhere else but a record is provided to help people find it. A record is created that alerts users to the existence of the data, and provides a link to where those data are held. A discovery and data record – in these cases, a record is created to help people discover the data exist, and the data themselves are deposited into the Data Catalogue. This process creates a unique Digital Object identifier (DOI) which can be used in citations to the data.
ePrints Soton is the University's Research Repository. It contains journal articles, books, PhD theses, conference papers, data, reports, working papers, art exhibitions and more. Where possible, journal articles, conference proceedings and research data made open access.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
This database contains references to publications that include numerical data, general information, comments, and reviews on atomic line broadening and shifts, and is part of the collection of the NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/grp01/asdc_info.cfm
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
iNaturalist is a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe. iNat is a platform for biodiversity research, where anyone can start up their own science project with a specific purpose and collaborate with other observers.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
BioPortal is an open repository of biomedical ontologies, a service that provides access to those ontologies, and a set of tools for working with them. BioPortal provides a wide range of such tools, either directly via the BioPortal web site, or using the BioPortal web service REST API. BioPortal also includes community features for adding notes, reviews, and even mappings to specific ontologies. BioPortal has four major product components: the web application; the API services; widgets, or applets, that can be installed on your own site; and a Virtual Appliance version that is available for download or through Amazon Web Services machine instance (AMI). There is also a beta release SPARQL endpoint.
Country
The "Flora of Bavaria" initiative with its data portal (14 million occurrence data) and Wiki representation is primarily a citizen science project. Efforts to describe and monitor the flora of Bavaria have been ongoing for 100 years. The goal of these efforts is to record all vascular plants, including newcomers, and to document threatened or former local occurrences. Being geographically largest state of Germany with a broad range of habitats, Bavaria has a special responsibility for documenting and maintaining its plant diversity . About 85% of all German vascular plant species occur in Bavaria, and in addition it has about 50 endemic taxa, only known from Bavaria (most of them occur in the Alps). The Wiki is collaboration of volunteers and local and regional Bavarian botanical societies. Everybody is welcome to contribute, especially with photos or reports of local changes in the flora. The Flora of Bavaria project is providing access to a research data repository for occurrence data powered by the Diversity Workbench database framework.
The Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX) is an open platform for sharing data across crises and organisations. Launched in July 2014, the goal of HDX is to make humanitarian data easy to find and use for analysis. HDX is managed by OCHA's Centre for Humanitarian Data, which is located in The Hague. OCHA is part of the United Nations Secretariat and is responsible for bringing together humanitarian actors to ensure a coherent response to emergencies. The HDX team includes OCHA staff and a number of consultants who are based in North America, Europe and Africa.
Geochron is a global database that hosts geochronologic and thermochronologic information from detrital minerals. Information included with each sample consists of a table with the essential isotopic information and ages, a table with basic geologic metadata (e.g., location, collector, publication, etc.), a Pb/U Concordia diagram, and a relative age probability diagram. This information can be accessed and viewed with any web browser, and depending on the level of access desired, can be designated as either private or public. Loading information into Geochron requires the use of U-Pb_Redux, a Java-based program that also provides enhanced capabilities for data reduction, plotting, and analysis. Instructions are provided for three different levels of interaction with Geochron: 1. Accessing samples that are already in the Geochron database. 2. Preparation of information for new samples, and then transfer to Arizona LaserChron Center personnel for uploading to Geochron. 3. Preparation of information and uploading to Geochron using U-Pb_Redux.
Country
The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
TCIA is a service which de-identifies and hosts a large archive of medical images of cancer accessible for public download. The data are organized as “collections”; typically patients’ imaging related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality or type (MRI, CT, digital histopathology, etc) or research focus. Supporting data related to the images such as patient outcomes, treatment details, genomics and expert analyses are also provided when available.
LacCore curates cores and samples from continental coring and drilling expeditions around the world, and also archives metadata and contact information for cores stored at other institutions.
Polish CLARIN node – CLARIN-PL Language Technology Centre – is being built at Wrocław University of Technology. The LTC is addressed to scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Registered users are granted free access to digital language resources and advanced tools to explore them. They can also archive and share their own language data (in written, spoken, video or multimodal form).
The North American Volcanic and Intrusive Rock Database (NAVDAT) is intended as a web-accessible repository for age, chemical and isotopic data from Mesozoic and younger igneous rocks in western North America. Please note: Although this site is fully functional, the content of NAVDAT has been static since 2014 and will not be updated until further notice. All data is still available via the EarthChem Portal http://ecp.iedadata.org/