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Found 48 result(s)
SeaBASS, the publicly shared archive of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data maintained by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG). High quality in situ measurements are prerequisite for satellite data product validation, algorithm development, and many climate-related inquiries. As such, the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) maintains a local repository of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data to support their regular scientific analyses. The SeaWiFS Project originally developed this system, SeaBASS, to catalog radiometric and phytoplankton pigment data used their calibration and validation activities. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, SeaBASS was expanded with oceanographic and atmospheric data collected by participants in the SIMBIOS Program, under NASA Research Announcements NRA-96 and NRA-99, which has aided considerably in minimizing spatial bias and maximizing data acquisition rates. Archived data include measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties, phytoplankton pigment concentrations, and other related oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as water temperature, salinity, stimulated fluorescence, and aerosol optical thickness. Data are collected using a number of different instrument packages, such as profilers, buoys, and hand-held instruments, and manufacturers on a variety of platforms, including ships and moorings.
The primary function of this database is to provide authoritative information about meteorite names. The correct spelling, complete with punctuation and diacritical marks, of all known meteorites recognized by the Meteoritical Society may be found in this compilation. Official abbreviations for many meteorites are documented here as well. The database also contains status information for meteorites with provisional names, and listings for specimens of doubtful origin and pseudometeorites. A seconday purpose of this database is to provide an interface to map services for the display of geographic information about meteorites. Two are currently implemented here. If the user has installed the free NASA program World Wind, links are provided for each meteorite to zoom the program to the find location. The database also provides links to the Google Maps service for the display of find locations.
Here you will find a collection of atomic microstructures that have been built by the atomic modeling community. Feel free to download any of these and use them in your own scientific explorations.The focus of this cyberinfrastructure is to advance the field of atomic-scale modeling of materials by acting as a forum for disseminating new atomistic scale methodologies, educating non-experts and the next generation of computational materials scientists, and serving as a bridge between the atomistic and complementary (electronic structure, mesoscale) modeling communities.
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint program of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), is a nationwide oncology outcomes database for more than 1,500 Commission-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Some 70 percent of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer in the United States are captured at the institutional level and reported to the NCDB. The NCDB, begun in 1989, now contains approximately 29 million records from hospital cancer registries across the United States. Data on all types of cancer are tracked and analyzed. These data are used to explore trends in cancer care, to create regional and state benchmarks for participating hospitals, and to serve as the basis for quality improvement.
Country
Research Data Centres offer a secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada's surveys, and to Canadian censuses' data, as well as to an increasing number of administrative data sets. The search engine was designed to help you find out more easily which dataset among all the surveys available in the RDCs best suits your research needs.
The Site Survey Data Bank (SSDB) is a repository for site survey data submitted in support of International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) proposals and expeditions. SSDB serves different roles for different sets of users.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
Neuroimaging Tools and Resources Collaboratory (NITRC) is currently a free one-stop-shop environment for science researchers that need resources such as neuroimaging analysis software, publicly available data sets, and computing power. Since its debut in 2007, NITRC has helped the neuroscience community to use software and data produced from research that, before NITRC, was routinely lost or disregarded, to make further discoveries. NITRC provides free access to data and enables pay-per-use cloud-based access to unlimited computing power, enabling worldwide scientific collaboration with minimal startup and cost. With NITRC and its components—the Resources Registry (NITRC-R), Image Repository (NITRC-IR), and Computational Environment (NITRC-CE)—a researcher can obtain pilot or proof-of-concept data to validate a hypothesis for a few dollars.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
iNaturalist is a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe. iNat is a platform for biodiversity research, where anyone can start up their own science project with a specific purpose and collaborate with other observers.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
Country
Kinsources is an open and interactive platform to archive, share, analyze and compare kinship data used in scientific research. Kinsources is not just another genealogy website, but a peer-reviewed repository designed for comparative and collaborative research. The aim of Kinsources is to provide kinship studies with a large and solid empirical base. Kinsources combines the functionality of communal data repository with a toolbox providing researchers with advanced software for analyzing kinship data. The software Puck (Program for the Use and Computation of Kinship data) is integrated in the statistical package and the search engine of the Kinsources website. Kinsources is part of a research perspective that seeks to understand the interaction between genealogy, terminology and space in the emergence of kinship structures. Hosted by the TGIR HumaNum, the platform ensures both security and free access to the scientific data is validated by the research community.
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.
The Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX) is an open platform for sharing data across crises and organisations. Launched in July 2014, the goal of HDX is to make humanitarian data easy to find and use for analysis. HDX is managed by OCHA's Centre for Humanitarian Data, which is located in The Hague. OCHA is part of the United Nations Secretariat and is responsible for bringing together humanitarian actors to ensure a coherent response to emergencies. The HDX team includes OCHA staff and a number of consultants who are based in North America, Europe and Africa.
Geochron is a global database that hosts geochronologic and thermochronologic information from detrital minerals. Information included with each sample consists of a table with the essential isotopic information and ages, a table with basic geologic metadata (e.g., location, collector, publication, etc.), a Pb/U Concordia diagram, and a relative age probability diagram. This information can be accessed and viewed with any web browser, and depending on the level of access desired, can be designated as either private or public. Loading information into Geochron requires the use of U-Pb_Redux, a Java-based program that also provides enhanced capabilities for data reduction, plotting, and analysis. Instructions are provided for three different levels of interaction with Geochron: 1. Accessing samples that are already in the Geochron database. 2. Preparation of information for new samples, and then transfer to Arizona LaserChron Center personnel for uploading to Geochron. 3. Preparation of information and uploading to Geochron using U-Pb_Redux.
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
Here you can find out more about Lancaster’s world-class research activities, view details of publications, outputs and awards and make contact with our researchers.
Content type(s)
A machine learning data repository with interactive visual analytic techniques. This project is the first to combine the notion of a data repository with real-time visual analytics for interactive data mining and exploratory analysis on the web. State-of-the-art statistical techniques are combined with real-time data visualization giving the ability for researchers to seamlessly find, explore, understand, and discover key insights in a large number of public donated data sets. This large comprehensive collection of data is useful for making significant research findings as well as benchmark data sets for a wide variety of applications and domains and includes relational, attributed, heterogeneous, streaming, spatial, and time series data as well as non-relational machine learning data. All data sets are easily downloaded into a standard consistent format. We also have built a multi-level interactive visual analytics engine that allows users to visualize and interactively explore the data in a free-flowing manner.
The Common Cold Project began in 2011 with the aim of creating, documenting, and archiving a database that combines final research data from 5 prospective viral-challenge studies that were conducted over the preceding 25 years: the British Cold Study (BCS); the three Pittsburgh Cold Studies (PCS1, PCS2, and PCS3); and the Pittsburgh Mind-Body Center Cold Study (PMBC). These unique studies assessed predictor (and hypothesized mediating) variables in healthy adults aged 18 to 55 years, experimentally exposed them to a virus that causes the common cold, and then monitored them for development of infection and signs and symptoms of illness.