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Found 91 result(s)
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint program of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), is a nationwide oncology outcomes database for more than 1,500 Commission-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Some 70 percent of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer in the United States are captured at the institutional level and reported to the NCDB. The NCDB, begun in 1989, now contains approximately 29 million records from hospital cancer registries across the United States. Data on all types of cancer are tracked and analyzed. These data are used to explore trends in cancer care, to create regional and state benchmarks for participating hospitals, and to serve as the basis for quality improvement.
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NONCODE is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Now, there are 16 species in NONCODE(human, mouse, cow, rat, chicken, fruitfly, zebrafish, celegans, yeast, Arabidopsis, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, opossum and platypus).The source of NONCODE includes literature and other public databases. We searched PubMed using key words ‘ncrna’, ‘noncoding’, ‘non-coding’,‘no code’, ‘non-code’, ‘lncrna’ or ‘lincrna. We retrieved the new identified lncRNAs and their annotation from the Supplementary Material or web site of these articles. Together with the newest data from Ensembl , RefSeq, lncRNAdb and GENCODE were processed through a standard pipeline for each species.
The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE) conducts epidemiological and health services research in diabetes among a large, multiethnic cohort of patients in a large, integrated health care delivery system.
The Data Catalogue is a service that allows University of Liverpool Researchers to create records of information about their finalised research data, and save those data in a secure online environment. The Data Catalogue provides a good means of making that data available in a structured way, in a form that can be discovered by both general search engines and academic search tools. There are two types of record that can be created in the Data Catalogue: A discovery-only record – in these cases, the research data may be held somewhere else but a record is provided to help people find it. A record is created that alerts users to the existence of the data, and provides a link to where those data are held. A discovery and data record – in these cases, a record is created to help people discover the data exist, and the data themselves are deposited into the Data Catalogue. This process creates a unique Digital Object identifier (DOI) which can be used in citations to the data.
The FishNet network is a collaborative effort among fish collections around the world to share and distribute data on specimen holdings. There is an open invitation for any institution with a fish collection to join.
The CiardRING is a global directory of web-based information services and datasets for agricultural research for development (ARD). It is the principal tool created through the CIARD initiative to allow information providers to register their services and datasets in various categories and so facilitate the discovery of sources of agriculture-related information across the world. The RING aims to provide an infrastructure to improve the accessibility of the outputs of agricultural research and of information relevant to agriculture.
ePrints Soton is the University's Research Repository. It contains journal articles, books, PhD theses, conference papers, data, reports, working papers, art exhibitions and more. Where possible, journal articles, conference proceedings and research data made open access.
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Research Data Centres offer a secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada's surveys, and to Canadian censuses' data, as well as to an increasing number of administrative data sets. The search engine was designed to help you find out more easily which dataset among all the surveys available in the RDCs best suits your research needs.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
Neuroimaging Tools and Resources Collaboratory (NITRC) is currently a free one-stop-shop environment for science researchers that need resources such as neuroimaging analysis software, publicly available data sets, and computing power. Since its debut in 2007, NITRC has helped the neuroscience community to use software and data produced from research that, before NITRC, was routinely lost or disregarded, to make further discoveries. NITRC provides free access to data and enables pay-per-use cloud-based access to unlimited computing power, enabling worldwide scientific collaboration with minimal startup and cost. With NITRC and its components—the Resources Registry (NITRC-R), Image Repository (NITRC-IR), and Computational Environment (NITRC-CE)—a researcher can obtain pilot or proof-of-concept data to validate a hypothesis for a few dollars.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
The Johns Hopkins Data Archive contains data collections produced by the Johns Hopkins community of researchers for public access and use. Each dataset has a citation and DOI, facilitating attribution and connection to research publications. If you are conducting research at Johns Hopkins and are interested in archiving your data with the JHU Data Archive, please contact us to discuss your research and data access needs. Currently, the JHU Data Archive operates on the Dataverse repository software platform. More information about the benefits of archiving data and the JHU Data Archive can be found here: http://dms.data.jhu.edu/archiving-2/
The Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study is following a cohort of nearly 5,000 children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 (roughly three-quarters of whom were born to unmarried parents). We refer to unmarried parents and their children as “fragile families” to underscore that they are families and that they are at greater risk of breaking up and living in poverty than more traditional families. The core Study was originally designed to primarily address four questions of great interest to researchers and policy makers: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?
iNaturalist is a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe. iNat is a platform for biodiversity research, where anyone can start up their own science project with a specific purpose and collaborate with other observers.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
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One of the world’s largest banks of biological, psychosocial and clinical data on people suffering from mental health problems. The Signature center systematically collects biological, psychosocial and clinical indicators from patients admitted to the psychiatric emergency and at four points throughout their journey in the hospital: upon arrival to the emergency room (state of crisis), at the end of their hospital stay, as well as at the beginning and the end of outpatient treatment. For all hospital clients who agree to participate, blood specimens are collected for the purpose of measuring metabolic, genetic, toxic and infectious biomarkers, while saliva samples are collected to measure sex hormones and hair samples are collected to measure stress hormones. Questionnaire has been selected to cover important dimensional aspects of mental illness such as Behaviour and Cognition (Psychosis, Depression, Anxiety, Impulsiveness, Aggression, Suicide, Addiction, Sleep),Socio-demographic Profile (Spiritual beliefs, Social functioning, Childhood experiences, Demographic, Family background) and Medical Data (Medication, Diagnosis, Long-term health, RAMQ data). On 2016, May there are more than 1150 participants and 400 for the longitudinal Follow-Up
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The Northern Ontario Plant Database (NOPD) is a website that provides free public access to records of herbarium specimens housed in northern Ontario educational and government institutions. A herbarium is an archival collection of plants that have been pressed, dried, mounted, and labelled. It also provides up-to-date and accurate information on the flora of northern Ontario.
CODEX is a database of NGS mouse and human experiments. Although, the main focus of CODEX is Haematopoiesis and Embryonic systems, the database includes a large variety of cell types. In addition to the publically available data, CODEX also includes a private site hosting non-published data. CODEX provides access to processed and curated NGS experiments. To use CODEX: (i) select a specialized repository (HAEMCODE or ESCODE) or choose the whole compendium (CODEX), then (ii) filter by organism and (iii) choose how to explore the database.
BioPortal is an open repository of biomedical ontologies, a service that provides access to those ontologies, and a set of tools for working with them. BioPortal provides a wide range of such tools, either directly via the BioPortal web site, or using the BioPortal web service REST API. BioPortal also includes community features for adding notes, reviews, and even mappings to specific ontologies. BioPortal has four major product components: the web application; the API services; widgets, or applets, that can be installed on your own site; and a Virtual Appliance version that is available for download or through Amazon Web Services machine instance (AMI). There is also a beta release SPARQL endpoint.