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Found 163 result(s)
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
Here you can find out more about Lancaster’s world-class research activities, view details of publications, outputs and awards and make contact with our researchers.
Born in Bradford is one of the biggest and most important medical research studies undertaken in the UK. The project started in 2007 and is looking to answer questions about our health by tracking the lives of 13,500 babies and their families and will provide information for studies across the UK and around the world. The aim of Born in Bradford is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness by studying children from all cultures and backgrounds as their lives unfold.
The Environmental Change Network is the UK’s long-term environmental monitoring and research (LTER) programme. We make regular measurements of plant and animal communities and their physical and chemical environment. Our long-term datasets are used to increase understanding of the effects of climate change, air pollution and other environmental pressures on UK ecosystems.
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
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A machine learning data repository with interactive visual analytic techniques. This project is the first to combine the notion of a data repository with real-time visual analytics for interactive data mining and exploratory analysis on the web. State-of-the-art statistical techniques are combined with real-time data visualization giving the ability for researchers to seamlessly find, explore, understand, and discover key insights in a large number of public donated data sets. This large comprehensive collection of data is useful for making significant research findings as well as benchmark data sets for a wide variety of applications and domains and includes relational, attributed, heterogeneous, streaming, spatial, and time series data as well as non-relational machine learning data. All data sets are easily downloaded into a standard consistent format. We also have built a multi-level interactive visual analytics engine that allows users to visualize and interactively explore the data in a free-flowing manner.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
The Common Cold Project began in 2011 with the aim of creating, documenting, and archiving a database that combines final research data from 5 prospective viral-challenge studies that were conducted over the preceding 25 years: the British Cold Study (BCS); the three Pittsburgh Cold Studies (PCS1, PCS2, and PCS3); and the Pittsburgh Mind-Body Center Cold Study (PMBC). These unique studies assessed predictor (and hypothesized mediating) variables in healthy adults aged 18 to 55 years, experimentally exposed them to a virus that causes the common cold, and then monitored them for development of infection and signs and symptoms of illness.
High spatial resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. The WorldPop project aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access population distribution datasets built using transparent approaches. The WorldPop project was initiated in October 2013 to combine the AfriPop, AsiaPop and AmeriPop population mapping projects. It aims to provide an open access archive of spatial demographic datasets for Central and South America, Africa and Asia to support development, disaster response and health applications. The methods used are designed with full open access and operational application in mind, using transparent, fully documented and peer-reviewed methods to produce easily updatable maps with accompanying metadata and measures of uncertainty.
TAED is a database of phylogenetically indexed gene families. It contains multiple sequence alignments from MAFFT1, maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees from PhyML2, bootstrap values for each node, dN/dS ratios for each lineage from the free ratios model in PAML3, and labels for each node of speciation or duplication from gene tree/species tree reconciliation using SoftParsMap4. The phylogenetic indexing enables simultaneous viewing of lineages with high dN/dS that occurred along the same species tree branches. Resources from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)5, have been incorporated into the TAED analysis to detect substitutions along each branch within the phylogenetic tree and to assess selection within pathways.
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CCCma has developed a number of climate models. These are used to study climate change and variability, and to understand the various processes which govern the climate system. They are also used to make quantitative projections of future long-term climate change (given various greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing scenarios), and increasingly to make initialized climate predictions on time scales ranging from seasons to decades. A brief description of these models and their corresponding references can be found: http://ec.gc.ca/ccmac-cccma/default.asp?lang=En&n=4A642EDE-1
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Various information, such as xylarium data with wood specimens collected since 1944, atmospheric observation data using the MU radar and other instruments, space-plasma data observed with GEOTAIL satellite, are now combined as Database of Humanosphere and served for public use. Proposals for scientific and technological use are always welcome.
The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken.
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The EuMMCR (European Mouse Mutant cell Repository) is the mouse ES cell distribution unit in Europe. The EuMMCR unit distributes targeting vectors and mutant ES cell lines produced in the EUCOMM and EUCOMMTOOLS consortia.
It is a common platform to deposit, store and share the research data in the area of social and behavioral sciences. openICPSR is undergoing development commiting international archiving standard and is currently free for all users to share their data up to a 2GB limit. It has a distribution network of over 760 institutions, governed by the Attribution 4.0 Creative Commons License and its' data catalog indexed by major search engines. OpenICPSR is a research data-sharing service that allows depositors to rapidly self-publish research data, enabling the public to access the data without charge. Otherwise via standard ICPSR deposits, one can publish and preserve reseach data with restricted-use having nominal charge. ICPSR is part of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan.
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DataDOI is a digital service by University of Tartu that collects, preserves, and distributes scientific research data. Open data can freely and without any restrictions be downloaded, disseminated and re-used
Climate Data Online (CDO) provides free access to NCDC's archive of global historical weather and climate data in addition to station history information. These data include quality controlled daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly measurements of temperature, precipitation, wind, and degree days as well as radar data and 30-year Climate Normals
TCIA is a service which de-identifies and hosts a large archive of medical images of cancer accessible for public download. The data are organized as “collections”; typically patients’ imaging related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality or type (MRI, CT, digital histopathology, etc) or research focus. Supporting data related to the images such as patient outcomes, treatment details, genomics and expert analyses are also provided when available.
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The repository is no longer available. <<<!!!<<< TOXNET's ITER is migrated to the NCBI Bookshelf (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/). >>>!!!>>>
The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership based at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland and a component of the National Space Weather Program. The CCMC provides, to the international research community, access to modern space science simulations. In addition, the CCMC supports the transition to space weather operations of modern space research models.
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The NIRD Research Data Archive is a repository that provides long-term storage for research data and is compliant with the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model . The aim of the archive is to provide (public) access to published research data and to promote cross-disciplinary studies. The NIRD Research Data Archive (NIRD Archive) is in full production. The NIRD Archive will operate on a “subject to approval” basis and will accept any type of research data from Norwegian academically funded projects that is no longer considered propriatory.
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More than a quarter of a million people — one in 10 NSW men and women aged over 45 — have been recruited to our 45 and Up Study, the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere. The baseline information collected from all of our participants is available in the Study’s Data Book. This information, which researchers use as the basis for their analyses, contains information on key variables such as height, weight, smoking status, family history of disease and levels of physical activity. By following such a large group of people over the long term, we are developing a world-class research resource that can be used to boost our understanding of how Australians are ageing. This will answer important health and quality-of-life questions and help manage and prevent illness through improved knowledge of conditions such as cancer, heart disease, depression, obesity and diabetes.