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Found 29 result(s)
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
Search and access 201 data sets covering the Atmosphere, Ocean, Land and more. Explore climate indices, reanalyses and satellite data and understand their application to climate model metrics. This is the only data portal that combines data discovery, metadata, figures and world-class expertise on the strengths, limitations and applications of climate data.
Surface air temperature change is a primary measure of global climate change. The GISTEMP project started in the late 1970s to provide an estimate of the changing global surface air temperature which could be compared with the estimates obtained from climate models simulating the effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance. The continuing analysis updates global temperature change from the late 1800s to the present.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is a database of intended for researchers to share information about cloud radiative properties. The data sets focus on the effects of clouds on the climate, the radiation budget, and the long-term hydrologic cycle. Within the data sets the data entries are broken down into entries of specific characteristics based on temporal resolution, spatial resolution, or temporal coverage.
SACA&D is developed as part of the Digitisasi Data Historis (Didah) project. This project is focusing on the digitization and use of high-resolution historical climate data from Indonesia and other Southeast Asian countries
The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) operates at the Seismological Laboratory at Caltech and is the primary archive of seismological data for southern California. The 1932-to-present Caltech/USGS catalog maintained by the SCEDC is the most complete archive of seismic data for any region in the United States. Our mission is to maintain an easily accessible, well-organized, high-quality, searchable archive for research in seismology and earthquake engineering.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
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BLLAST is a research programme aimed at exploring the late afternoon transition of the atmospheric boundary layer. The late afternoon period of the diurnal cycle of the boundary layer is poorly understood. This is yet an important transition period that impacts the transport and dillution of water vapour and trace species. The main questions adressed by the project are: - How the turbulence activity fades when heating by the surface decreases? - What is the impact on the transport of chemical species? - How relevant processes can be represented in numerical models? To answer all these questions, a field campaign was carried out during the summer of 2011 (from June 14 to July 8). Many observation systems were then deployed and operated by research teams coming from France and abroad. They were spanning a large spectrum of space and time scales in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the boundary layer processes. The observation strategy consisted in intensifying the operations in the late afternoon with tethered balloons, resarch aircrafts and UAVs.
To understand the global surface energy budget is to understand climate. Because it is impractical to cover the earth with monitoring stations, the answer to global coverage lies in reliable satellite-based estimates. Efforts are underway at NASA and universities to develop algorithms to do this, but such projects are in their infancy. In concert with these ambitious efforts, accurate and precise ground-based measurements in differing climatic regions are essential to refine and verify the satellite-based estimates, as well as to support specialized research. To fill this niche, the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs.
On February 24, 2000, Terra began collecting what will ultimately become a new, 15-year global data set on which to base scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Together with the entire fleet of EOS spacecraft, Terra is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change. TERRA's data collection instruments include: Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)
NCEP delivers national and global weather, water, climate and space weather guidance, forecasts, warnings and analyses to its Partners and External User Communities. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), an arm of the NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), is comprised of nine distinct Centers, and the Office of the Director, which provide a wide variety of national and international weather guidance products to National Weather Service field offices, government agencies, emergency managers, private sector meteorologists, and meteorological organizations and societies throughout the world. NCEP is a critical national resource in national and global weather prediction. NCEP is the starting point for nearly all weather forecasts in the United States. The Centers are: Aviation Weather Center (AWC), Climate Prediction Center (CPC), Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), NCEP Central Operations (NCO), National Hurricane Center (NHC), Ocean Prediction Center (OPC), Storm Prediction Center (SPC), Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), Weather Prediction Center (WPC)
US Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Center is a long-term archive and distribution facility for various ground-based, aerial and model data products in support of atmospheric and climate research. ARM facility currently operates over 400 instruments at various observatories (https://www.arm.gov/capabilities/observatories). ARM Data Center (ADC) Archive currently holds over 11,000 data products with a total holding of over 1.5 petabytes of data that dates back to 1993, these include data from instruments, value added products, model outputs, field campaign and PI contributed data. The data center archive also includes data collected by ARM from related program (e.g., external data such as NASA satellite).
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CCCma has developed a number of climate models. These are used to study climate change and variability, and to understand the various processes which govern the climate system. They are also used to make quantitative projections of future long-term climate change (given various greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing scenarios), and increasingly to make initialized climate predictions on time scales ranging from seasons to decades. A brief description of these models and their corresponding references can be found: http://ec.gc.ca/ccmac-cccma/default.asp?lang=En&n=4A642EDE-1
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
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>>>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada is now part of Ocean Networks Canada and this website is being phased out. Please visit us on our new website at oceannetworks.ca >>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada, the North-East Pacific Time-series Undersea Networked Experiments, is the world's first regional scale cabled deep ocean observing network. It consists of an 800km network of electro‐optic cable laid on the seabed over the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, off the coast of British Columbia. This tectonic plate serves as an exceptional natural laboratory for ocean observation and experiments. NEPTUNE Canada instruments yield continuous real‐time data and imagery from the ocean surface to beneath the seafloor, and from the coast to the deep sea. They respond to events such as earthquakes, tsunamis, fish migrations, plankton blooms, storms and volcanic eruptions. NEPTUNE Canada offers a unique and exciting approach to ocean science.
This website is a portal that enables access to multi-Terabyte turbulence databases. The data reside on several nodes and disks on our database cluster computer and are stored in small 3D subcubes. Positions are indexed using a Z-curve for efficient access.
Summit Station is a US National Science Foundation-funded research station on the Greenland ice cap. The website offers near-real time weather summaries and a webcam. Other data associated with the Summit Station can be found through the International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) website: http://iasoa.org or from Greenland Environmental Observatory at geosummit.org
This site contains active weather alerts, warnings, watches, and advisories concerning the US State of Alaska and the surrounding waters. Near-real time data are available as are historical records. Links to the National Data Buoy Center are provided for coastal and ocean conditions around Alaska.
The NCAR is a federally funded research and development center committed to research and education in atmospheric science and related scientific fields. NCAR seeks to support and enhance the scientific community nationally and globally by monitoring and researching the atmosphere and related physical and biological systems. Users can access climate and earth models created to better understand the atmosphere, the Earth and the Sun; as well as data from various NCAR research programs and projects. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation in addition to various other U.S. agencies.
PISCO researchers collect biological, chemical, and physical data about ocean ecosystems in the nearshore portions of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. Data are archived and used to create summaries and graphics, in order to ensure that the data can be used and understood by a diverse audience of managers, policy makers, scientists and the general public.
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>>>!!!<<<VENUS coastal network, is now part of the Ocean Networks Canada Observatory>>>!!!<<< VENUS is a cabled undersea laboratory for ocean researchers and explorers. VENUS delivers real time information from seafloor instruments via fibre optic cables to the University of Victoria, BC. You can see ocean data live, recent and archived as well as learn more about on-going research