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Found 36 result(s)
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
>>>!!!<<< SMD has been retired. After approximately fifteen years of microarray-centric research service, the Stanford Microarray Database has been retired. We apologize for any inconvenience; please read below for possible resolutions to your queries. If you are looking for any raw data that was directly linked to SMD from a manuscript, please search one of the public repositories. NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus EBI ArrayExpress All published data were previously communicated to one (or both) of the public repositories. Alternatively, data for publications between 1997 and 2004 were likely migrated to the Princeton University MicroArray Database, and are accessible there. If you are looking for a manuscript supplement (i.e. from a domain other than smd.stanford.edu), perhaps try searching the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine https://archive.org/web/ . >>>!!!<<< The Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) is a DNA microarray research database that provides a large amount of data for public use.
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The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
The PAIN Repository is a recently funded NIH initiative, which has two components: an archive for already collected imaging data (Archived Repository), and a repository for structural and functional brain images and metadata acquired prospectively using standardized acquisition parameters (Standardized Repository) in healthy control subjects and patients with different types of chronic pain. The PAIN Repository provides the infrastructure for storage of standardized resting state functional, diffusion tensor imaging and structural brain imaging data and associated biological, physiological and behavioral metadata from multiple scanning sites, and provides tools to facilitate analysis of the resulting comprehensive data sets.
Neotoma is a multiproxy paleoecological database that covers the Pliocene-Quaternary, including modern microfossil samples. The database is an international collaborative effort among individuals from 19 institutions, representing multiple constituent databases. There are over 20 data-types within the Neotoma Paleoecological Database, including pollen microfossils, plant macrofossils, vertebrate fauna, diatoms, charcoal, biomarkers, ostracodes, physical sedimentology and water chemistry. Neotoma provides an underlying cyberinfrastructure that enables the development of common software tools for data ingest, discovery, display, analysis, and distribution, while giving domain scientists control over critical taxonomic and other data quality issues.
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NONCODE is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Now, there are 16 species in NONCODE(human, mouse, cow, rat, chicken, fruitfly, zebrafish, celegans, yeast, Arabidopsis, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, opossum and platypus).The source of NONCODE includes literature and other public databases. We searched PubMed using key words ‘ncrna’, ‘noncoding’, ‘non-coding’,‘no code’, ‘non-code’, ‘lncrna’ or ‘lincrna. We retrieved the new identified lncRNAs and their annotation from the Supplementary Material or web site of these articles. Together with the newest data from Ensembl , RefSeq, lncRNAdb and GENCODE were processed through a standard pipeline for each species.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
Open access repository for digital research created at the University of Minnesota. U of M researchers may deposit data to the Libraries’ Data Repository for U of M (DRUM), subject to our collection policies. All data is publicly accessible. Data sets submitted to the Data Repository are reviewed by data curation staff to ensure that data is in a format and structure that best facilitates long-term access, discovery, and reuse.
ScholarsArchive@OSU is Oregon State University's digital service for gathering, indexing, making available and storing the scholarly work of the Oregon State University community. It also includes materials from outside the institution in support of the university's land, sun, sea and space grant missions and other research interests.
STOREDB is a platform for the archiving and sharing of primary data and outputs of all kinds, including epidemiological and experimental data, from research on the effects of radiation. It also provides a directory of bioresources and databases containing information and materials that investigators are willing to share. STORE supports the creation of a radiation research commons.
The UniPROBE (Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation) database hosts data generated by universal protein binding microarray (PBM) technology on the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins. This initial release of the UniPROBE database provides a centralized resource for accessing comprehensive data on the preferences of proteins for all possible sequence variants ('words') of length k ('k-mers'), as well as position weight matrix (PWM) and graphical sequence logo representations of the k-mer data. In total, the database currently hosts DNA binding data for 406 nonredundant proteins from a diverse collection of organisms, including the prokaryote Vibrio harveyi, the eukaryotic malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the parasitic Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse, and human. The database's web tools (on the right) include a text-based search, a function for assessing motif similarity between user-entered data and database PWMs, and a function for locating putative binding sites along user-entered nucleotide sequences
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
The Database contains all publicly available HMS LINCS datasets and information for each dataset about experimental reagents (small molecule perturbagens, cells, antibodies, and proteins) and experimental and data analysis protocols.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) is a consortium of laboratories working to provide the scientific and medical community with tools to facilitate research. The key components are: (1) a molecular atlas of gene expression for the developing organs of the GenitoUrinary (GU) tract; (2) a high resolution molecular anatomy that highlights development of the GU system; (3) mouse strains to facilitate developmental and functional studies within the GU system; (4) tutorials describing GU organogenesis; and (5) rapid access to primary data via the GUDMAP database.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
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Birdata is your gateway to BirdLife Australia data including the Atlas of Australian Birds and Nest record scheme. You can use Birdata to draw bird distribution maps and generate bird lists for any part of the country. You can also join in the Atlas and submit survey information to this important environmental database. Birdata is a partnership between Birds Australia and the Tony and Lisette Lewis Foundation's WildlifeLink program to collect and make Birds Australia data available online.
Europeana is the trusted source of cultural heritage brought to you by the Europeana Foundation and a large number of European cultural institutions, projects and partners. It’s a real piece of team work. Ideas and inspiration can be found within the millions of items on Europeana. These objects include: Images - paintings, drawings, maps, photos and pictures of museum objects Texts - books, newspapers, letters, diaries and archival papers Sounds - music and spoken word from cylinders, tapes, discs and radio broadcasts Videos - films, newsreels and TV broadcasts All texts are CC BY-SA, images and media licensed individually.