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Found 37 result(s)
SeaBASS, the publicly shared archive of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data maintained by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG). High quality in situ measurements are prerequisite for satellite data product validation, algorithm development, and many climate-related inquiries. As such, the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) maintains a local repository of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data to support their regular scientific analyses. The SeaWiFS Project originally developed this system, SeaBASS, to catalog radiometric and phytoplankton pigment data used their calibration and validation activities. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, SeaBASS was expanded with oceanographic and atmospheric data collected by participants in the SIMBIOS Program, under NASA Research Announcements NRA-96 and NRA-99, which has aided considerably in minimizing spatial bias and maximizing data acquisition rates. Archived data include measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties, phytoplankton pigment concentrations, and other related oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as water temperature, salinity, stimulated fluorescence, and aerosol optical thickness. Data are collected using a number of different instrument packages, such as profilers, buoys, and hand-held instruments, and manufacturers on a variety of platforms, including ships and moorings.
The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) develops, produces, archives and disseminates satellite-data-based products in support to climate monitoring. The product suite mainly covers parameters related to the energy & water cycle and addresses many of the Essential Climate Variables as defined by GCOS (GCOS 138). The CM SAF produces both Enviromental Data Records and Climate Data Records.
The GOES Space Environment Monitor archive is an important component of the National Space Weather Program --a interagency program to provide timely and reliable space environment observations and forecasts. GOES satellites carry onboard a Space Environment Monitor subsystem that measures X-rays, Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field at the Spacecraft.
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
The Site Survey Data Bank (SSDB) is a repository for site survey data submitted in support of International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) proposals and expeditions. SSDB serves different roles for different sets of users.
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The repository is no longer available <<<!!!<<< The Senate Commission on Oceanography planned and coordinated the activities of the DFG in the field of marine research from 1959 until 2017. Most notably, it advised on matters pertaining to the research vessels METEOR and (from 2006 onwards) MARIA S. MERIAN, which are co-funded by the DFG. The focus was on the review process and evaluation of proposed voyages for these two ships. The Expert Research Vessel Panel (GPF) appointed by the BMBF and DFG, which is responsible for the review process for proposed voyages for all global, oceanic and regional German research vessels within the framework of a joint procedure developed by the BMBF, DFG and HGF, was constituted on 7 March 2018 and thus took on this task concerning METEOR and MARIA S. MERIAN from the Senate Commission on Oceanography. More information on the new review process can be found on the German Research Vessels Portal. https://www.portal-forschungsschiffe.de/index.php?index=53 >>>!!!>>>
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) operates at the Seismological Laboratory at Caltech and is the primary archive of seismological data for southern California. The 1932-to-present Caltech/USGS catalog maintained by the SCEDC is the most complete archive of seismic data for any region in the United States. Our mission is to maintain an easily accessible, well-organized, high-quality, searchable archive for research in seismology and earthquake engineering.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
The Global Carbon Atlas is an online platform to explore, visualize and interpret global and regional carbon data arising from both human activities and natural processes. The graphics and data sources are made available in the belief that their wide dissemination will lead to new knowledge and better-informed decisions to limit and cope with human-induced climate change. The Global Carbon Atlas is a community effort under the umbrella of the Global Carbon Project based on the contributions of many research institutions and individual scientists around the world who make available observations, models, and interpretation skills.
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The Data Portal German Marine Research is a product of the Marine Network for Integrated Data Access (MaNIDA) funded cooperatively by the Helmholtz Association and the affiliated universities. The consortium aims to implement a sustainable e-infrastructure for coherent discovery, view, download and dissemination of marine research data.
To understand the global surface energy budget is to understand climate. Because it is impractical to cover the earth with monitoring stations, the answer to global coverage lies in reliable satellite-based estimates. Efforts are underway at NASA and universities to develop algorithms to do this, but such projects are in their infancy. In concert with these ambitious efforts, accurate and precise ground-based measurements in differing climatic regions are essential to refine and verify the satellite-based estimates, as well as to support specialized research. To fill this niche, the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs.
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.
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eKlima is a web site to access the database of climate data of the Norwegian Meteorological Institute from an external computer. The database contains measurements made by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and its collaborators as far back in time as 1957. There are also some data that are older than that, with the longest data sets going as far back in time as 150 years. However, for the period before 1957 not all measurements are completely digitised yet.
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The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
The Environmental Change Network is the UK’s long-term environmental monitoring and research (LTER) programme. We make regular measurements of plant and animal communities and their physical and chemical environment. Our long-term datasets are used to increase understanding of the effects of climate change, air pollution and other environmental pressures on UK ecosystems.
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken.
Climate Data Online (CDO) provides free access to NCDC's archive of global historical weather and climate data in addition to station history information. These data include quality controlled daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly measurements of temperature, precipitation, wind, and degree days as well as radar data and 30-year Climate Normals
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The Coriolis Data Centre handles operational oceanography measurements made in situ, complementing the measurement of the ocean surface made using instruments aboard satellites. This work is realised through the establishment of permanent networks with data collected by ships or autonomous systems that are either fixed or drifting. This data can be used to construct a snapshot of water mass structure and current intensity.
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HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiemnt. Considering the science and societal issues motivating HyMeX, the programme aims to : improve our understanding of the water cycle, with emphasis on extreme events, by monitoring and modelling the Mediterranean atmosphere-land-ocean coupled system, its variability from the event to the seasonal and interannual scales, and its characteristics over one decade (2010-2020) in the context of global change, assess the social and economic vulnerability to extreme events and adaptation capacity.The multidisciplinary research and the database developed within HyMeX should contribute to: improve observational and modelling systems, especially for coupled systems, better predict extreme events, simulate the long-term water-cycle more accurately, provide guidelines for adaptation measures, especially in the context of global change.