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Found 59 result(s)
The Woods Hole Open Access Server, WHOAS, is an institutional repository that captures, stores, preserves, and redistributes the intellectual output of the Woods Hole scientific community in digital form. WHOAS is managed by the MBLWHOI Library as a service to the Woods Hole scientific community
Welcome to INTERMAGNET - the global network of observatories, monitoring the Earth's magnetic field. At this site you can find data and information from geomagnetic observatories around the world. The INTERMAGNET programme exists to establish a global network of cooperating digital magnetic observatories, adopting modern standard specifications for measuring and recording equipment, in order to facilitate data exchanges and the production of geomagnetic products in close to real time.
NWS/NCEP/Climate Prediction Center delivers climate prediction, monitoring, and diagnostic products for timescales from weeks to years to the Nation and the global community for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the economy. The goal of the CPC website is to provide easy and comprehensive access to data and products that serve our mission. We serve a broad audience ranging from government to non-government entities like academia, NGO’s, and the public and private sectors. Specific sectors include agriculture, energy, health, transportation, emergency managers, etc.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. DIPnet was created to advance genetic diversity research in the Indo-Pacific by aggregating population genetic metadata into a searchable database (GeOME).
TES is the first satellite instrument to provide simultaneous concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, water vapor and methane throughout Earth’s lower atmosphere. This lower atmosphere (the troposphere) is situated between the surface and the height at which aircraft fly, and is an important part of the atmosphere that we often impact with our activities.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
The BGS is a data-rich organisation with over 400 datasets in its care; including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives. Our data is managed by the National Geoscience Data Centre.
The PDS archives and distributes scientific data from NASA planetary missions, astronomical observations, and laboratory measurements. The PDS is sponsored by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Its purpose is to ensure the long-term usability of NASA data and to stimulate advanced research
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Historical Climate Data (formerly: The National Climate Data and Information Archive - NCDC) is a web-based resource maintained by Environment and Climate Change Canada and the Meteorological Service of Canada. The site houses a number of statistical and data compilation and viewing tools. From the website, users can access historical climate data for Canadian locations and dates, view climate normals and averages, and climate summaries. A list of Canadian air stations and their meteorological reports and activities is also available, along with rainfall statistics for more than 500 locations across Canada. Users can also download the Canadian daily climate data for 2006/07. In addition, technical documentation is offered for data users to interpret the available data. Other documentation includes a catalogue of Canadian weather reporting stations, a glossary, and a calculation of the 1971 to 2000 climate normals for Canada. This resource carries authority and accuracy because it is maintained by a national government department and service. While the majority of the statistics are historical, the data is up-to-date and contains current and fairly recent climate data. This government resource is intended for an audience that has the ability and knowledge to interpret climatological data
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
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BLLAST is a research programme aimed at exploring the late afternoon transition of the atmospheric boundary layer. The late afternoon period of the diurnal cycle of the boundary layer is poorly understood. This is yet an important transition period that impacts the transport and dillution of water vapour and trace species. The main questions adressed by the project are: - How the turbulence activity fades when heating by the surface decreases? - What is the impact on the transport of chemical species? - How relevant processes can be represented in numerical models? To answer all these questions, a field campaign was carried out during the summer of 2011 (from June 14 to July 8). Many observation systems were then deployed and operated by research teams coming from France and abroad. They were spanning a large spectrum of space and time scales in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the boundary layer processes. The observation strategy consisted in intensifying the operations in the late afternoon with tethered balloons, resarch aircrafts and UAVs.
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The Data Portal German Marine Research is a product of the Marine Network for Integrated Data Access (MaNIDA) funded cooperatively by the Helmholtz Association and the affiliated universities. The consortium aims to implement a sustainable e-infrastructure for coherent discovery, view, download and dissemination of marine research data.
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
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The arctic data archive system (ADS) collects observation data and modeling products obtained by various Japanese research projects and gives researchers to access the results. By centrally managing a wide variety of Arctic observation data, we promote the use of data across multiple disciplines. Researchers use these integrated databases to clarify the mechanisms of environmental change in the atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and cryosphere. That ADS will be provide an opportunity of collaboration between modelers and field scientists, can be expected.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS): http://www.iobis.org/, see also: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset
The main goal of the ECCAD project is to provide scientific and policy users with datasets of surface emissions of atmospheric compounds, and ancillary data, i.e. data required to estimate or quantify surface emissions. The supply of ancillary data - such as maps of population density, maps of fires spots, burnt areas, land cover - could help improve and encourage the development of new emissions datasets. ECCAD offers: Access to global and regional emission inventories and ancillary data, in a standardized format Quick visualization of emission and ancillary data Rationalization of the use of input data in algorithms or emission models Analysis and comparison of emissions datasets and ancillary data Tools for the evaluation of emissions and ancillary data ECCAD is a dynamical and interactive database, providing the most up to date datasets including data used within ongoing projects. Users are welcome to add their own datasets, or have their regional masks included in order to use ECCAD tools.
The MGDS Academic Seismic Portal at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (ASP-LDEO), now part of the IEDA Data Facility, was initiated in 2003 to preserve and provide open access to multi-channel seismic (MCS) and single channel seismic (SCS) field data collected for academic research supported by the US National Science Foundation. Multi-channel data are primarily from the marine seismic vessels operated by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Modern single channel seismic data from other vessels including the R/V Palmer and USCG Healy, as well as data from portable seismic systems, are also served. The data center is operated in partnership with the Academic Seismic Portal at UTIG (http://www-udc.ig.utexas.edu/sdc/), which focuses primarily on processed multi-channel seismic data, but also serves field data from programs conducted by UTIG investigators. The development of the Academic Seismic Portal has focused on the need to recover high value MCS data from older surveys as well as to establish sustainable procedures for preservation of data from modern programs. During the final two years of R/V Ewing operations, procedures were established for routine transfer of MCS data along with navigation and acquisition parameters, and other needed documentation to the ASP. Transfer of seismic data and acquisition information is now routine for the National Marine Seismic Facility, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, which began science operations in February 2008. Data are documented and incorporated into the data system with full access restrictions protecting the scientists' rights to exclusive access during the proprietary hold period. Submission of data to the ASP helps ensure that NSF requirements for data sharing as outlined in the NSF OCE Data Policy are satisfied.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.