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Found 25 result(s)
WorldClim is a set of global climate layers (climate grids) with a spatial resolution of about 1 square kilometer. The data can be used for mapping and spatial modeling in a GIS or with other computer programs.
Exposome-Explorer is the first database dedicated to biomarkers of exposure to environmental risk factors for diseases. It contains detailed information on the nature of biomarkers, populations and subjects where measured, samples analyzed, methods used for biomarker analyses, concentrations in biospecimens, correlations with external exposure measurements, and biological reproducibility over time.
This interactive database provides complete access to statistics on seasonal cotton supply and use for each country and each region in the world, from 1920/21 to date. This project is part of ICAC’s efforts to improve the transparency of world cotton statistics.
The ENCODE Encyclopedia organizes the most salient analysis products into annotations, and provides tools to search and visualize them. The Encyclopedia has two levels of annotations: Integrative-level annotations integrate multiple types of experimental data and ground level annotations. Ground-level annotations are derived directly from the experimental data, typically produced by uniform processing pipelines.
>>>!!!<<< 2019-01: Global Land Cover Facility goes offline see https://spatialreserves.wordpress.com/2019/01/07/global-land-cover-facility-goes-offline/ ; no more access to http://www.landcover.org >>>!!!<<< The Global Land Cover Facility (GLCF) provides earth science data and products to help everyone to better understand global environmental systems. In particular, the GLCF develops and distributes remotely sensed satellite data and products that explain land cover from the local to global scales.
mentha archives evidence collected from different sources and presents these data in a complete and comprehensive way. Its data comes from manually curated protein-protein interaction databases that have adhered to the IMEx consortium. The aggregated data forms an interactome which includes many organisms. mentha is a resource that offers a series of tools to analyse selected proteins in the context of a network of interactions. Protein interaction databases archive protein-protein interaction (PPI) information from published articles. However, no database alone has sufficient literature coverage to offer a complete resource to investigate "the interactome". mentha's approach generates every week a consistent interactome (graph). Most importantly, the procedure assigns to each interaction a reliability score that takes into account all the supporting evidence. mentha offers eight interactomes (Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Escherichia coli K12, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) plus a global network that comprises every organism, including those not mentioned. The website and the graphical application are designed to make the data stored in mentha accessible and analysable to all users. Source databases are: MINT, IntAct, DIP, MatrixDB and BioGRID.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
The IERS provides data on Earth orientation, on the International Celestial Reference System/Frame, on the International Terrestrial Reference System/Frame, and on geophysical fluids. It maintains also Conventions containing models, constants and standards.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
The Brain Transcriptome Database (BrainTx) project aims to create an integrated platform to visualize and analyze our original transcriptome data and publicly accessible transcriptome data related to the genetics that underlie the development, function, and dysfunction stages and states of the brain.
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
The Portal aims to serve as a unique access point to timely, comprehensive migration statistics and reliable information about migration data globally. The site is designed to help policy makers, national statistics officers, journalists and the general public interested in the field of migration to navigate the increasingly complex landscape of international migration data, currently scattered across different organisations and agencies. Especially in critical times, such as those faced today, it is essential to ensure that responses to migration are based on sound facts and accurate analysis. By making the evidence about migration issues accessible and easy to understand, the Portal aims to contribute to a more informed public debate. The Portal was launched in December 2017 and is managed and developed by IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC), with the guidance of its Advisory Board, and was supported in its conception by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). The Portal is supported financially by the Governments of Germany, the United States of America and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).
The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File (JEFF) project is a collaboration between NEA Data Bank member countries. The JEFF library combines the efforts of the JEFF and EFF/EAF Working Groups to produce a common sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications. It contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yields, and thermal scattering law data
The Inter-regional Geomagnetic Data Center of the Russian-Ukrainian INTERMAGNET segment is operated by the Geophysical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (GC RAS). Geomagnetic data are transmitted from observatories and stations located in Russia and Ukraine. The particular feature of the Center is the automated system for real-time recognition of artificial (anthropogenic) disturbances in incoming data. Being based on fuzzy logic approach, this quality control system facilitates the preparation of the definitive magnetograms from preliminary records carried out by data experts manually. The collected geomagnetic data are stored using relational database management system. The geomagnetic database is intended for storing both 1-minute and 1-second data. The results of anthropogenic disturbance recognition are also stored in the database.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
Nuclear Data Services contains atomic, molecular and nuclear data sets for the development and maintenance of nuclear technologies. It includes energy-dependent reaction probabilities (cross sections), the energy and angular distributions of reaction products for many combinations of target and projectile, and the atomic and nuclear properties of excited states, and their radioactive decay data. Their main concern is providing data required to design a modern nuclear reactor for electricity production. Approximately 11.5 million nuclear data points have been measured and compiled into computerized form.
coastDat is a model based data bank developed mainly for the assessment of long-term changes in data sparse regions. A sequence of numerical models is employed to reconstruct all aspects of marine climate (such as storms, waves, surges etc.) over many decades of years relying only on large-scale information such as large-scale atmospheric conditions or bathymetry.
The WDC has a FTP-server to distribute the PCN index derived from the geomagnetic observatory Qaanaaq (THL) and the Kp-index data products derived at the geomagnetic observatory Niemegk (NGK). The WDC is also holding extensive archives of magnetograms and other geomagnetic observatory data products that predate the introduction of digital data recording. The material is in analogue form such as film or microfiche. The Polar Cap index (abbreviation PC index) consists of the Polar Cap North (PCN) and the Polar Cap South (PCS) index, which are derived from magnetic measurements taken at the geomagnetic observatories Qaanaaq (THL, Greenland, +85o magnetic latitude) and Vostok (VOS, Antarctica, -83o magnetic latitude), respectively. The idea behind these indices is to estimate the intensity of anti-sunward plasma convection in the polar caps. This convection is associated with electric Hall currents and consequent magnetic field variations perpendicular to the antisunward plasma flow (and related Hall current) which can be monitored at the Qaanaaq and Vostok magnetic observatories. PC aims at monitoring the energy input from solar wind to the magnetosphere (loading activity). The index is constructed in such a way that it has a linear relationship with the merging Electric Field at the magnetopause; consequently PC is given in units of mV/m as for the electric field. In August 2013, the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) endorsed the PC index. The endorsed PC index is accessible at pcindex.org or through WDC Copenhagen.
SureChemOpen is a free resource for researchers who want to search, view and link to patent chemistry. For end-users with professional search and analysis needs, we offer the fully-featured SureChemPro. For enterprise users, SureChemDirect provides all our patent chemistry via an API or a data feed. The SureChem family of products is built upon the Claims® Global Patent Database, a comprehensive international patent collection provided by IFI Claims®. This state of the art database is normalized and curated to provide unprecedented consistency and quality.
The United Nations Data (UND) site provides access to 33 databases and over 60million records. UN Statistical Databases include datasets on Energy Statistics, International Finances, The State of the World’s Children, and World Contraceptive Use; among many other global social, environmental and economic subjects.
Kochi Core Center (KCC) houses one of the 3 Inernationational Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) core repositories, accompanied by images and x-ray CT scanning data viewable by the Virtual Core Library. And it hosts Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) marine core samples and associated analytical data for general scientific or educational uses, after 2 years have passed since collection of core samples.
The NASA/GEWEX SRB project is a major component of the GEWEX radiation research. The objective of the NASA/GEWEX SRB project is to determine surface, top-of-atmosphere (TOA), and atmospheric shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes with the precision needed to predict transient climate variations and decadal-to-centennial climate trends.
A new global data compilation consisting of 35,523 terrestrial data points and 23,013 marine data points may be downloaded in Excel csv format. This compilation does not contain the descriptive codes relating to metadata that were included in the previous compilations. Users are advised to consult the references and make their own interpretations as to the quality of the data. Previous compilations of the data were provided by Lee and Uyeda (1965), Simmons and Horai (1968), Jessop, Hobart, and Sclater (1975), and Pollack, Hurter, and Johnson, 1993.