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Found 14 result(s)
The Brain Transcriptome Database (BrainTx) project aims to create an integrated platform to visualize and analyze our original transcriptome data and publicly accessible transcriptome data related to the genetics that underlie the development, function, and dysfunction stages and states of the brain.
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We developed a method, ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq), combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and massively parallel sequencing to identify mammalian DNA sequences bound by transcription factors in vivo. We used ChIP-seq to map STAT1 targets in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated and unstimulated human HeLa S3 cells, and compared the method's performance to ChIP-PCR and to ChIP-chip for four chromosomes.For both Chromatin- immunoprecipation Transcription Factors and Histone modifications. Sequence files and the associated probability files are also provided.
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The cisRED database holds conserved sequence motifs identified by genome scale motif discovery, similarity, clustering, co-occurrence and coexpression calculations. Sequence inputs include low-coverage genome sequence data and ENCODE data. A Nucleic Acids Research article describes the system architecture
The ENCODE Encyclopedia organizes the most salient analysis products into annotations, and provides tools to search and visualize them. The Encyclopedia has two levels of annotations: Integrative-level annotations integrate multiple types of experimental data and ground level annotations. Ground-level annotations are derived directly from the experimental data, typically produced by uniform processing pipelines.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The modENCODE Project, Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements, was initiated by the funding of applications received in response to Requests for Applications (RFAs) HG-06-006, entitled Identification of All Functional Elements in Selected Model Organism Genomes and HG-06-007, entitled A Data Coordination Center for the Model Organism ENCODE Project (modENCODE). The modENCODE Project is being run as an open consortium and welcomes any investigator willing to abide by the criteria for participation that have been established for the project. Both computational and experimental approaches are being applied by modENCODE investigators to study the genomes of D. melanogaster and C. elegans. An added benefit of studying functional elements in model organisms is the ability to biologically validate the elements discovered using methods that cannot be applied in humans. The comprehensive dataset that is expected to result from the modENCODE Project will provide important insights into the biology of D. melanogaster and C. elegans as well as other organisms, including humans.
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The Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression is a quantitative and comprehensive atlas of gene expression in mouse development. Gene expression levels from 198 tissue samples was measured using 202 Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). Emphasis was on mouse development, samples taken at different stages of mouse development.
Clone DB contains information about genomic clones and cDNA and cell-based libraries for eukaryotic organisms. The database integrates this information with sequence data, map positions, and distributor information. At this time, Clone DB contains records for genomic clones and libraries, the collection of MICER mouse gene targeting clones and cell-based gene trap and gene targeting libraries from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium, Lexicon and the International Gene Trap Consortium. A planned expansion for Clone DB will add records for additional gene targeting and gene trap clones, as well as cDNA clones.
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The Organelle Genome Megasequencing Program (OGMP) provides mitochondrial, chloroplast, and mitochondrial plasmid genome data. OGMP tools allow direct comparison of OGMP and NCBI validated records. Includes GOBASE, a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts.
>>>!!!<<<Efforts to obtain renewed funding after 2008 were unfortunately not successful. PANDIT has therefore been frozen since November 2008, and its data are not updated since September 2005 when version 17.0 was released (corresponding to Pfam 17.0). The existing data and website remain available from these pages, and should remain stable and, we hope, useful. >>>!!!<<< PANDIT is a collection of multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees. It contains corresponding amino acid and nucleotide sequence alignments, with trees inferred from each alignment. PANDIT is based on the Pfam database (Protein families database of alignments and HMMs), and includes the seed amino acid alignments of most families in the Pfam-A database. DNA sequences for as many members of each family as possible are extracted from the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and aligned according to the amino acid alignment. PANDIT also contains a further copy of the amino acid alignments, restricted to the sequences for which DNA sequences were found.
>>>!!!<<< SMD has been retired. After approximately fifteen years of microarray-centric research service, the Stanford Microarray Database has been retired. We apologize for any inconvenience; please read below for possible resolutions to your queries. If you are looking for any raw data that was directly linked to SMD from a manuscript, please search one of the public repositories. NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus EBI ArrayExpress All published data were previously communicated to one (or both) of the public repositories. Alternatively, data for publications between 1997 and 2004 were likely migrated to the Princeton University MicroArray Database, and are accessible there. If you are looking for a manuscript supplement (i.e. from a domain other than smd.stanford.edu), perhaps try searching the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine https://archive.org/web/ . >>>!!!<<< The Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) is a DNA microarray research database that provides a large amount of data for public use.
The UniPROBE (Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation) database hosts data generated by universal protein binding microarray (PBM) technology on the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins. This initial release of the UniPROBE database provides a centralized resource for accessing comprehensive data on the preferences of proteins for all possible sequence variants ('words') of length k ('k-mers'), as well as position weight matrix (PWM) and graphical sequence logo representations of the k-mer data. In total, the database currently hosts DNA binding data for 406 nonredundant proteins from a diverse collection of organisms, including the prokaryote Vibrio harveyi, the eukaryotic malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the parasitic Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse, and human. The database's web tools (on the right) include a text-based search, a function for assessing motif similarity between user-entered data and database PWMs, and a function for locating putative binding sites along user-entered nucleotide sequences