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Found 13 result(s)
Presented here are excitation cross sections measured for a select number of transitions using the Merged Electron-Ion Beams Energy Loss (MEIBEL) experiment. This is a collaboration of JILA and the Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), where the apparatus is located. Since there exist a nearly infinite number of transitions in multicharged ions we have chosen a few that serve as benchmarks for theoretical efforts. Of particular interest are forbidden transitions which are often dominated by dielectronic resonances whose positions and magnitudes are difficult to predict theoretically.
Physical Reference Data compiles physical data and biblographic sources: Physical constants, atomic spectroscopy data, molecular spectroscopic data, X-Ray and Gamma-Ray data, nuclear physics data etc.
Presented here are experimental ionization cross sections measured using the Electron-Ion Crossed Beams apparatus in the Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) at the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The data are given in both graphical and tabular form along with the reference to the original publication of the experimental results. Also presented in the figures are theoretical cross sections supporting the experiments.
The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File (JEFF) project is a collaboration between NEA Data Bank member countries. The JEFF library combines the efforts of the JEFF and EFF/EAF Working Groups to produce a common sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications. It contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yields, and thermal scattering law data
Nuclear Data Services contains atomic, molecular and nuclear data sets for the development and maintenance of nuclear technologies. It includes energy-dependent reaction probabilities (cross sections), the energy and angular distributions of reaction products for many combinations of target and projectile, and the atomic and nuclear properties of excited states, and their radioactive decay data. Their main concern is providing data required to design a modern nuclear reactor for electricity production. Approximately 11.5 million nuclear data points have been measured and compiled into computerized form.
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The TDB project aims to produce a database that: contains data for all the elements of interest in radioactive waste disposal systems; documents why and how the data were selected; gives recommendations based on original experimental data, rather than compilations and estimates; documents the sources of experimental data used; is internally consistent; and treats all solids and aqueous species of the elements of interest for nuclear waste storage performance assessment calculations. The database compiles formation data (Gibbs energies, enthalpies, entropies and heat capacities) for each aqueous species and solid phase of interest, as well as chemical reactions and their corresponding thermodynamic data. Non thermodynamic data (diffusion or kinetics) and sorption data are not considered in the TDB project.
The CERN Open Data portal is the access point to a growing range of data produced through the research performed at CERN. It disseminates the preserved output from various research activities, including accompanying software and documentation which is needed to understand and analyze the data being shared.
When published in 2005, the Millennium Run was the largest ever simulation of the formation of structure within the ΛCDM cosmology. It uses 10(10) particles to follow the dark matter distribution in a cubic region 500h(−1)Mpc on a side, and has a spatial resolution of 5h−1kpc. Application of simplified modelling techniques to the stored output of this calculation allows the formation and evolution of the ~10(7) galaxies more luminous than the Small Magellanic Cloud to be simulated for a variety of assumptions about the detailed physics involved. As part of the activities of the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory we have created relational databases to store the detailed assembly histories both of all the haloes and subhaloes resolved by the simulation, and of all the galaxies that form within these structures for two independent models of the galaxy formation physics. We have implemented a Structured Query Language (SQL) server on these databases. This allows easy access to many properties of the galaxies and halos, as well as to the spatial and temporal relations between them. Information is output in table format compatible with standard Virtual Observatory tools. With this announcement (from 1/8/2006) we are making these structures fully accessible to all users. Interested scientists can learn SQL and test queries on a small, openly accessible version of the Millennium Run (with volume 1/512 that of the full simulation). They can then request accounts to run similar queries on the databases for the full simulations. In 2008 and 2012 the simulations were repeated.
The KADoNiS (Karlsruhe Astrophysical Database of Nucleosynthesis in Stars) project is an online database for cross sections relevant for s-process and the p-process nucleosynthesis. Recently, the p-process part of the KADoNiS database has been extended, and now includes almost all available experimental data from reactions in or close to the respective Gamow window
The ADAS Project is a self-funding (i.e. funded by participants) project consisting of most major fusion laboratories along with other astrophysical and university groups. As an implementation, it is an interconnected set of computer codes and data collections for modelling the radiating properties of ions and atoms in plasmas. It can address plasmas ranging from the interstellar medium through the solar atmosphere and laboratory thermonuclear fusion devices to technological plasmas. ADAS assists in the analysis and interpretation of spectral emission and supports detailed plasma models.