Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Data licenses

Data upload

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 10 result(s)
The Keck Observatory Archive (KOA)is a collaboration between the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO). This collaboration is founded by the NASA. KOA has been archiving data from the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) since August 2004 and data acquired with the Near InfraRed echelle SPECtrograph (NIRSPEC) since May 2010. The archived data extend back to 1994 for HIRES and 1999 for NIRSPEC. The W. M. Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) ingests and curates data from the following instruments: DEIMOS, ESI, HIRES, KI, LRIS, MOSFIRE, NIRC2, and NIRSPEC.
The European VLBI Network (EVN) is an interferometric array of radio telescopes located primarily in Europe and Asia, with additional telescopes in South Africa and Puerto Rico. The EVN performs high-resolution observations of cosmic radio sources at wavelenghts from 92cm to 7mm. The EVN Data Archive contains, among other things, the correlated data from EVN observations plus pipeline output, including the initial calibration tables to apply to the correlated data and preliminary images. In general, the correlated data and some pipeline results are proprietary for one year following distribution to the PI of the final epoch of observations resulting from a proposal after which the data enters the public domain; more details are in the "EVN Data Access Policy" linked via the archive-introduction page.
Country
The task of WDC geomagnetism is to collect geomagnetic data from all over the globe and distribute those data to researchers and data users, as a World Data Center for Geomagnetism.
AtomDB is an atomic database useful for X-ray plasma spectral modeling. The current version of AtomDB is primarly used for modeing collisional plasmas, those where hot electrons colliding with astrophysically abundant elements and ions create X-ray emission. However, AtomDB is also useful when modeling absorption by elements and ions or even photoionized plasmas, where X-ray photons (often from a simple power-law source) interacting with elements and ions create complex spectra.
>>>!!!<<< The repository is offline >>>!!!<<< On June 1, 1990 the German X-ray observatory ROSAT started its mission to open a new era in X-ray astronomy. Doubtless, this is the most ambitious project realized up to now in the short history of this young astronomical discipline. Equipped with the largest imaging X-ray telescope ever inserted into an earth orbit ROSAT has provided a tremendous amount of new scientific data and insights.
The WDC Geomagnetism, Edinburgh has a comprehensive set of digital geomagnetic data as well as indices of geomagnetic activity supplied from a worldwide network of magnetic observatories. The data and services at the WDC are available for scientific use without restrictions.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.
STARK-B is a database of calculated widths and shifts of isolated lines of atoms and ions due to electron and ion collisions. This database is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes. In addition, it is also devoted to laboratory plasmas, laser equipments and technological plasmas. So, the domain of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is wide and depends on the ionization degree of the considered ion. The temperature can vary from several thousands for neutral atoms to several hundred thousands of Kelvin for highly charged ions. The electron or ion density can vary from 1012 (case of stellar atmospheres) to several 1019cm-3 (some white dwarfs and some laboratory plasmas).