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Found 22 result(s)
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
AIRS moves climate research and weather prediction into the 21st century. AIRS is one of six instruments on board the Aqua satellite, part of the NASA Earth Observing System. AIRS along with its partner microwave instrument the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit AMSU-A, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. Together these instruments observe the global water and energy cycles, climate variation and trends, and the response of the climate system to increased greenhouse gases.
Surface air temperature change is a primary measure of global climate change. The GISTEMP project started in the late 1970s to provide an estimate of the changing global surface air temperature which could be compared with the estimates obtained from climate models simulating the effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance. The continuing analysis updates global temperature change from the late 1800s to the present.
The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is a database of intended for researchers to share information about cloud radiative properties. The data sets focus on the effects of clouds on the climate, the radiation budget, and the long-term hydrologic cycle. Within the data sets the data entries are broken down into entries of specific characteristics based on temporal resolution, spatial resolution, or temporal coverage.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
On February 24, 2000, Terra began collecting what will ultimately become a new, 15-year global data set on which to base scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Together with the entire fleet of EOS spacecraft, Terra is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change. TERRA's data collection instruments include: Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)
The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth’s atmosphere from three broadband channels. CERES products include both solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation from the top of the atmosphere to the Earth's surface.
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CCCma has developed a number of climate models. These are used to study climate change and variability, and to understand the various processes which govern the climate system. They are also used to make quantitative projections of future long-term climate change (given various greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing scenarios), and increasingly to make initialized climate predictions on time scales ranging from seasons to decades. A brief description of these models and their corresponding references can be found: http://ec.gc.ca/ccmac-cccma/default.asp?lang=En&n=4A642EDE-1
Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) was launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit on December 18, 1999, aboard TERRA, a NASA satellite orbiting 705 km above the Earth. MOPITT monitors changes in pollution patterns and the effects on Earth’s troposphere. MOPITT uses near-infrared radiation at 2.3 µm and thermal-infrared radiation at 4.7 µm to calculate atmospheric profiles of CO.
DARECLIMED data repository consists of three kind of data: (a) climate, (b) water resources, and (c) energy related data. The first part, climate datasets, will include atmospheric and indirect atmospheric data, proxies and reconstructions, terrestrial and oceanic data. Land use, population, economy and development data will be added as well. Datasets can be handled and analyzed by connecting to the Live Access Server (LAS), which enables to visualize data with on-the-fly graphics, request custom subsets of variables in a choice of file formats, access background reference material about the data (metadata), and compare (difference) variables from distributed locations. Access to server is granted upon request by emailing the data repository manager.
Country
Wetter, Wolken, Klima is a collection of actual and archived climate dates of Germany since 2004. Based at KIT Meteorological Institute it includes special Cloud images from Karlsruhe, actual weather records based on 70 german stations, average snowfall and precipitation of Germany, weather warnings worldwide with archive, satellite images worldwide, actual weather radar worldwide, analyses and prognosis and precipitation rate of Baden-Württemberg.
The Alaska Climate Research Center archives and provides digital climate records, climate statistics, and monthly weather summaries on Alaska and the polar regions. The Alaska Climate Research Center is part of the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Country
The CCDS is an interface for distributing climate change information. The goals of CCDS are to: Support climate change impact and adaptation research in Canada and other countries; Support stakeholders requiring scenario information for decision making and policy development. Provide access to Canadian research on the development of scenarios and adaptation research.
Originally named the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), the mission was re-named the Van Allen Probes, following successful launch and commissioning. For simplicity and continuity, the RBSP short-form has been retained for existing documentation, file naming, and data product identification purposes. The RBSPICE investigation including the RBSPICE Instrument SOC maintains compliance with requirements levied in all applicable mission control documents.
IRMA (Integrated Resource Management Applications) provides natural and cultural resources data from the National Park Service. Most entries are in the form of peer-reviewed publications, but some are raw data sets based on in-park research projects.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
The NASA/GEWEX SRB project is a major component of the GEWEX radiation research. The objective of the NASA/GEWEX SRB project is to determine surface, top-of-atmosphere (TOA), and atmospheric shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes with the precision needed to predict transient climate variations and decadal-to-centennial climate trends.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.