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Found 8 result(s)
The Global Carbon Atlas is an online platform to explore, visualize and interpret global and regional carbon data arising from both human activities and natural processes. The graphics and data sources are made available in the belief that their wide dissemination will lead to new knowledge and better-informed decisions to limit and cope with human-induced climate change. The Global Carbon Atlas is a community effort under the umbrella of the Global Carbon Project based on the contributions of many research institutions and individual scientists around the world who make available observations, models, and interpretation skills.
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AVISO stands for "Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data". Here, you will find data, articles, news and tools to help you discover or improve your skills in the altimetry domain through four key themes: ocean, coast, hydrology and ice. Altimetry is a technique for measuring height. Satellite altimetry measures the time taken by a radar pulse to travel from the satellite antenna to the surface and back to the satellite receiver. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield sea-surface heights.
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The Coriolis Data Centre handles operational oceanography measurements made in situ, complementing the measurement of the ocean surface made using instruments aboard satellites. This work is realised through the establishment of permanent networks with data collected by ships or autonomous systems that are either fixed or drifting. This data can be used to construct a snapshot of water mass structure and current intensity.
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
The CALIPSO satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. CALIPSO combines an active lidar instrument with passive infrared and visible imagers to probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. CALIPSO was launched on April 28, 2006, with the CloudSat satellite. CALIPSO and CloudSat are highly complementary and together provide new, never-before-seen 3D perspectives of how clouds and aerosols form, evolve, and affect weather and climate. CALIPSO and CloudSat fly in formation with three other satellites in the A-train constellation to enable an even greater understanding of our climate system.
Argo is an international programme using autonomous floats to collect temperature, salinity and current data in the ice-free oceans. It is teamed with the Jason ocean satellite series.Argo will soon reach its target of 3000 floats delivering data within 24 hours to researchers and operational centres worldwide. 23 countries contribute floats to Argo and many others help with float deployments. Argo has revolutionized the collection of information from inside the oceans. ARGO Project is organized in regional and national Centers with a Project Office, an Information Center (AIC) and 2 Global Data Centers (GDAC), at the United States and at France. Each DAC submits regularly all its new files to both USGODAE and Coriolis GDACs.The whole Argo data set is available in real time and delayed mode from the global data centres (GDACs). The internet addresses are: • http://www.usgodae.org/argo/argo.html • http://www.argodatamgt.org .