Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 7 result(s)
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
Country
Research Data Centres offer a secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada's surveys, and to Canadian censuses' data, as well as to an increasing number of administrative data sets. The search engine was designed to help you find out more easily which dataset among all the surveys available in the RDCs best suits your research needs.
GitHub is the best place to share code with friends, co-workers, classmates, and complete strangers. Over three million people use GitHub to build amazing things together. With the collaborative features of GitHub.com, our desktop and mobile apps, and GitHub Enterprise, it has never been easier for individuals and teams to write better code, faster. Originally founded by Tom Preston-Werner, Chris Wanstrath, and PJ Hyett to simplify sharing code, GitHub has grown into the largest code host in the world.
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
The Qualitative Data Repository (QDR) is a dedicated archive for storing and sharing digital data (and accompanying documentation) generated or collected through qualitative and multi-method research in the social sciences. QDR provides search tools to facilitate the discovery of data, and also serves as a portal to material beyond its own holdings, with links to U.S. and international archives. The repository’s initial emphasis is on political science.
Country
RADAR is an online service for the archival and publication of research data resulting from completed scientific studies and projects. RADAR is a generic, interdisciplinary service which offers two service levels: data archival and data publication (including archival). Data archival offers format-independent long-term storage with user-defined rentention periods. By default, archived data and associated metadata will not be published, unless specified otherwise by the RADAR user. The RADAR service offers flexible data and metadata access management, so that RADAR users are able to share preserved datasets with specific users. Bitstream preservation will produce backup copies of the data at three different locations to ensure its long-term availability. - Flexible retention period (5, 10, 15 years) - By default "Dark archive" - Data providers determine access rights (private/shared/public) - Yearly payment scheme for institutions Data publication includes the allocation of a DataCite DOI at point of publication. The RADAR service includes an optional embargo period for the publication of submitted data that can be subsequently prolonged if necessary. The dataset along with the metadata describing the dataset will be published and allocated a DOI to ensure that each specific datasets can be found and cited once any embargo period has expired. Within the publication service, a peer review option may be used. The RADAR user will receive a secure review URL provided by RADAR which may then be forwarded to an editor or reviewer responsible for a corresponding manuscript submission. The respective dataset is locked for the duration of the peer review process. - Unlimited holding period (minimum 25 years guaranteed) - Optional embargos - Assigning a DOI (DataCite) - Interface for peer review - Selection of licences, no CC0 required - Metadata is indexed (RADAR, DataCite, OAI, Google) - One-time payment scheme for institutions
The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital repository for the digital records of archaeological investigations. tDAR’s use, development, and maintenance are governed by Digital Antiquity, an organization dedicated to ensuring the long-term preservation of irreplaceable archaeological data and to broadening the access to these data.