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The Plasmid Information Database (PlasmID) was established in 2004 to curate, maintain, and distribute cDNA and ORF constructs for use in basic molecular biological research. The materials deposited at our facility represent the culmination of several international collaborative efforts from 2004 to present: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital.
HumanCyc provides an encyclopedic reference on human metabolic pathways. It provides a zoomable human metabolic map diagram, and it has been used to generate a steady-state quantitative model of human metabolism. 2016: Subscriptions are now required to access HumanCyc. For more information on obtaining a subscription, click here: http://www.phoenixbioinformatics.org/biocyc#product-biocyc-subscription
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More than a quarter of a million people — one in 10 NSW men and women aged over 45 — have been recruited to our 45 and Up Study, the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere. The baseline information collected from all of our participants is available in the Study’s Data Book. This information, which researchers use as the basis for their analyses, contains information on key variables such as height, weight, smoking status, family history of disease and levels of physical activity. By following such a large group of people over the long term, we are developing a world-class research resource that can be used to boost our understanding of how Australians are ageing. This will answer important health and quality-of-life questions and help manage and prevent illness through improved knowledge of conditions such as cancer, heart disease, depression, obesity and diabetes.