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Found 18 result(s)
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
caNanoLab is a data sharing portal designed to facilitate information sharing in the biomedical nanotechnology research community to expedite and validate the use of nanotechnology in biomedicine. caNanoLab provides support for the annotation of nanomaterials with characterizations resulting from physico-chemical and in vitro assays and the sharing of these characterizations and associated nanotechnology protocols in a secure fashion.
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Oral Cancer Gene Database is an initiative of the Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer, Navi Mumbai. The present database, version II, consists of 374 genes. It is developed as a user friendly site that would provide the scientist, information and external links from one place. The database is accessed through a list of all genes, and Keyword Search using gene name or gene symbol, chromosomal location, CGH (in %), and molecular weight. Interaction Network shows the interaction between genes for particular biological processes and molecular functions.
The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database supports the use of the mouse as a model system of hereditary cancer by providing electronic access to: Information on endogenous spontaneous and induced tumors in mice, including tumor frequency & latency data, Information on genetically defined mice (inbred, hybrid, mutant, and genetically engineered strains of mice) in which tumors arise, Information on genetic factors associated with tumor susceptibility in mice and somatic genetic-mutations observed in the tumors, Tumor pathology reports and images, References, supporting MTB data and Links to other online resources for cancer.
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BioGrid Australia Limited operates a federated data sharing platform for collaborative translational health and medical research providing a secure infrastructure that advances health research by linking privacy-protected and ethically approved data among a wide network of health collaborators. BioGrid links real-time de-identified health data across institutions, jurisdictions and diseases to assist researchers and clinicians improve their research and clinical outcomes. The web-based infrastructure provides ethical access while protecting both privacy and intellectual property.
The repository is no longer available <<<!!!<<< TOXNET has moved. Most content will continue to be collected and reviewed; selected information is accessible through PubChem, PubMed, and Bookshelf. If you have questions, please contact NLM Customer Support at https://support.nlm.nih.gov/ >>>!!!>>>
Apollo (previously DSpace@Cambridge) is the University of Cambridge’s institutional repository, preserving and providing access to content created by members of the University. The repository stores a range of content and provides different levels of access, but its primary focus is on providing open access to the University’s research publications.
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The repository is no longer available. <<<!!!<<< TOXNET's ITER is migrated to the NCBI Bookshelf (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/). >>>!!!>>>
TCIA is a service which de-identifies and hosts a large archive of medical images of cancer accessible for public download. The data are organized as “collections”; typically patients’ imaging related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality or type (MRI, CT, digital histopathology, etc) or research focus. Supporting data related to the images such as patient outcomes, treatment details, genomics and expert analyses are also provided when available.
The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR) is a collection of databases and tools designed to help researchers study the genetics of human ageing using modern approaches such as functional genomics, network analyses, systems biology and evolutionary analyses.
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The German National Cohort (NAKO) has been inviting men and women aged between 20 and 69 to 18 study centers throughout Germany since 2014. The participants are medically examined and questioned about their living conditions. The GNC’s aim is to investigate the causes of chronic diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, rheumatism, infectious diseases, and dementia in order to improve prevention, early diagnoses and treatment of these very widely spread diseases.
The repository is no longer available. <<<!!!<<< CCRIS information is migrated to PubChem (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pcsubstance?term=%22Chemical%20Carcinogenesis%20Research%20Information%20System%20(CCRIS)%22%5BSourceName%5D%20AND%20hasnohold%5Bfilt%5D) Help for CCRIS Users in PubChem: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/toxnet/Accessing_CCRIS_Content_from_PubChem.html or PDF: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/toxnet/Accessing_CCRIS_Content_from_PubChem.pdf. >>>!!!>>>
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The repository is no longer available. <<<!!!<<< Visit IRIS at EPA: https://www.epa.gov/iris >>>!!!>>>
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More than a quarter of a million people — one in 10 NSW men and women aged over 45 — have been recruited to our 45 and Up Study, the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere. The baseline information collected from all of our participants is available in the Study’s Data Book. This information, which researchers use as the basis for their analyses, contains information on key variables such as height, weight, smoking status, family history of disease and levels of physical activity. By following such a large group of people over the long term, we are developing a world-class research resource that can be used to boost our understanding of how Australians are ageing. This will answer important health and quality-of-life questions and help manage and prevent illness through improved knowledge of conditions such as cancer, heart disease, depression, obesity and diabetes.
The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) has characterizations of hundreds of strains of laboratory mice to facilitate translational discoveries and to assist in selection of strains for experimental studies.
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Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database is for all who are interested in mutations of the Androgen Receptor Gene. In light of the difficulty in getting new AR mutations published the curator will now accept new mutations that have not been published, provided that it is from a reputable research or clinical laboratory. The curator also strongly suggests that where possible, particularly in the case of new unique mutations that an attempt be made to at least confirm the pathogenicity of the putatative mutation, by showing that the mutation when transfected into a suitable expression system produces a mutant androgen receptor protein.