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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://www.massive.org.au/ and https://store.erc.monash.edu.au/experiment/view/104/ and see 'remarks'.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
PSI is a global health organization dedicated to improving the health of people in the developing world by focusing on serious challenges like a lack of family planning, HIV and AIDS, barriers to maternal health, and the greatest threats to children under five, including malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia and malnutrition. A hallmark of PSI is a commitment to the principle that health services and products are most effective when they are accompanied by robust communications and distribution efforts that help ensure wide acceptance and proper use. PSI works in partnership with local governments, ministries of health and local organizations to create health solutions that are built to last. We use original data to monitor and evaluate our programs, generate consumer insight, estimate the impact of our solutions, and evaluate the health of the markets we work to strengthen.
MEASURE DHS is advancing global understanding of health and population trends in developing countries through nationally-representative household surveys that provide data for a wide range of monitoring and impact evaluation indicators in the areas of population, health, HIV, and nutrition. The database collects, analyzes, and disseminates data from more than 300 surveys in over 90 countries. MEASURE DHS distributes, at no cost, survey data files for legitimate academic research.