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Found 59 result(s)
The National Oceanographic Data Center includes the National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC) and the NOAA Central Library, which are integrated to provide access to the world's most comprehensive sources of marine environmental data and information. NODC maintains and updates a national ocean archive with environmental data acquired from domestic and foreign activities and produces products and research from these data which help monitor global environmental changes. These data include physical, biological and chemical measurements derived from in situ oceanographic observations, satellite remote sensing of the oceans, and ocean model simulations. >>>!!!<<< For informations about the migration of data from NODC to NCEI see: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/about/index.html >>>!!!<<<
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
EM-DAT is a global database on natural and technological disasters, containing essential core data on the occurrence and effects of more than 22,000 disasters in the world, from 1900 to present. EM-DAT provides geographical, temporal, human and economic information on disasters at the country level. The database is compiled from various sources, including UN agencies, non-governmental organisations, insurance companies, research institutes and press agencies.
GigaDB primarily serves as a repository to host data and tools associated with articles in GigaScience (GigaScience is an online, open-access journal). GigaDB defines a dataset as a group of files (e.g., sequencing data, analyses, imaging files, software programs) that are related to and support an article or study. GigaDB allows the integration of manuscript publication with supporting data and tools.
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SISMER (Scientific Information Systems for the Sea) is Ifremer's service in charge of managing numerous marine databases and information systems which Ifremer is responsible for implementing. The information systems managed by SISMER range from CATDS (SMOS satellite data) to geoscience data (bathymetry, seismics, geological samples), not forgetting water column data (physics and chemistry, data for operational oceanography – Coriolis - Copernicus CMEMS), fisheries data (Harmonie), coastal environment data (Quadrige 2) and deep-sea environment data (Archimède). SISMER therefore plays a pivotal role in marine database management both for Ifremer and for many national, European and international projects.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.
Data.gov increases the ability of the public to easily find, download, and use datasets that are generated and held by the Federal Government. Data.gov provides descriptions of the Federal datasets (metadata), information about how to access the datasets, and tools that leverage government datasets
The Ensembl genome annotation system, developed jointly by the EBI and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been used for the annotation, analysis and display of vertebrate genomes since 2000. Since 2009, the Ensembl site has been complemented by the creation of five new sites, for bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and invertebrate metazoa, enabling users to use a single collection of (interactive and programatic) interfaces for accessing and comparing genome-scale data from species of scientific interest from across the taxonomy. In each domain, we aim to bring the integrative power of Ensembl tools for comparative analysis, data mining and visualisation across genomes of scientific interest, working in collaboration with scientific communities to improve and deepen genome annotation and interpretation.
The OpenNeuro project (formerly known as the OpenfMRI project) was established in 2010 to provide a resource for researchers interested in making their neuroimaging data openly available to the research community. It is managed by Russ Poldrack and Chris Gorgolewski of the Center for Reproducible Neuroscience at Stanford University. The project has been developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Drug Abuse, and the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.