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Found 276 result(s)
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
Country
eKlima is a web site to access the database of climate data of the Norwegian Meteorological Institute from an external computer. The database contains measurements made by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and its collaborators as far back in time as 1957. There are also some data that are older than that, with the longest data sets going as far back in time as 150 years. However, for the period before 1957 not all measurements are completely digitised yet.
The EPN (or EUREF Permanent Network) is a voluntary organization of several European agencies and universities that pool resources and permanent GNSS station data to generate precise GNSS products. The EPN has been created under the umbrella of the International Association Geodesy and more precisely by its sub-commission EUREF. The European Terrestrial Reference System 89 (ETRS89) is used as the standard precise GPS coordinate system throughout Europe. Supported by EuroGeographics and endorsed by the EU, this reference system forms the backbone for all geographic and geodynamic projects on the European territory both on a national as on an international level.
ICOS Carbon Portal is the data portal of the Integrated Carbon Observation System. It provides observational data from the state of the carbon cycle in Europe and the world. The Carbon Portal is the data center of the ICOS infrastructure. ICOS will collect greenhouse gas concentration and fluxes observations from three separate networks, all these observations are carried out to support research to help us understand how the Earth’s greenhouse gas balance works, because there are still many and large uncertainties!
US Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Center is a long-term archive and distribution facility for various ground-based, aerial and model data products in support of atmospheric and climate research. ARM facility currently operates over 400 instruments at various observatories (https://www.arm.gov/capabilities/observatories). ARM Data Center (ADC) Archive currently holds over 11,000 data products with a total holding of over 1.5 petabytes of data that dates back to 1993, these include data from instruments, value added products, model outputs, field campaign and PI contributed data. The data center archive also includes data collected by ARM from related program (e.g., external data such as NASA satellite).
Country
Data are the key to successful scientific work. A sophisticated data management will guarantee the long-term availability of observational data and metadata, and will allow for an easy data search and retrieval, to supplement the international data exchange and to provide data products for scientific, political, industrial and public stakeholders.
The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) is a publicly accessible earth science data repository created to curate, publicly serve (publish), and archive digital data and information from biological, chemical and biogeochemical research conducted in coastal, marine, great lakes and laboratory environments. The BCO-DMO repository works closely with investigators funded through the NSF OCE Division’s Biological and Chemical Sections and the Division of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems. The office provides services that span the full data life cycle, from data management planning support and DOI creation, to archive with appropriate national facilities.
The R2R Portal is a central shore-side gateway through which underway data from oceanographic expeditions will be routinely cataloged and securely transmitted to the national long-term archives including the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).
The WRDC, located at the Main Geophysical Observatory in St. Petersburg, Russia, processes solar radiation data currently submitted from more than 500 stations located in 56 countries and operates an archive with more than 1200 stations listed in its catalogue. The WRDC is the central depository of the measured components such as: global, diffuse and direct solar radiation, downward atmospheric radiation, net total and terrestrial surface radiation (upward), spectral radiation components (instantaneous fluxes), and sunshine duration, on hourly, daily or monthly basis.
The mission of the GDC is to curate and provide access to oceanographic data, especially from Scripps expeditions, making them accessible for scientific and educational use worldwide. Originally launched by Bill Menard, the GDC has been in operation for more than 40 years. While many historic physical artifacts are carefully preserved, the current emphasis is on digital archiving, in coordination with other national and international programs.
The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through managing data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis. The CEDA Archive operates the atmospheric and earth observation data centre functions on behalf of NERC for the UK atmospheric science and earth observation communities. It covers climate, composition, observations and NWP data as well as various earth observation datasets, including airborne and satellite data and imagery. Prior to November 2016 these functions were operted by CEDA under the titles of the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) and the NERC Earth Observation Data Centre (NEODC). CEDA also operates the UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC), which curates and provides access to archives of data from the upper atmosphere, ionosphere and Earth's solar environment.
The main goal of the ECCAD project is to provide scientific and policy users with datasets of surface emissions of atmospheric compounds, and ancillary data, i.e. data required to estimate or quantify surface emissions. The supply of ancillary data - such as maps of population density, maps of fires spots, burnt areas, land cover - could help improve and encourage the development of new emissions datasets. ECCAD offers: Access to global and regional emission inventories and ancillary data, in a standardized format Quick visualization of emission and ancillary data Rationalization of the use of input data in algorithms or emission models Analysis and comparison of emissions datasets and ancillary data Tools for the evaluation of emissions and ancillary data ECCAD is a dynamical and interactive database, providing the most up to date datasets including data used within ongoing projects. Users are welcome to add their own datasets, or have their regional masks included in order to use ECCAD tools.
The MGDS Academic Seismic Portal at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (ASP-LDEO), now part of the IEDA Data Facility, was initiated in 2003 to preserve and provide open access to multi-channel seismic (MCS) and single channel seismic (SCS) field data collected for academic research supported by the US National Science Foundation. Multi-channel data are primarily from the marine seismic vessels operated by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Modern single channel seismic data from other vessels including the R/V Palmer and USCG Healy, as well as data from portable seismic systems, are also served. The data center is operated in partnership with the Academic Seismic Portal at UTIG (http://www-udc.ig.utexas.edu/sdc/), which focuses primarily on processed multi-channel seismic data, but also serves field data from programs conducted by UTIG investigators. The development of the Academic Seismic Portal has focused on the need to recover high value MCS data from older surveys as well as to establish sustainable procedures for preservation of data from modern programs. During the final two years of R/V Ewing operations, procedures were established for routine transfer of MCS data along with navigation and acquisition parameters, and other needed documentation to the ASP. Transfer of seismic data and acquisition information is now routine for the National Marine Seismic Facility, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, which began science operations in February 2008. Data are documented and incorporated into the data system with full access restrictions protecting the scientists' rights to exclusive access during the proprietary hold period. Submission of data to the ASP helps ensure that NSF requirements for data sharing as outlined in the NSF OCE Data Policy are satisfied.
The U.S. Antarctic Program Data Center (USAP-DC) supports investigators funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF http://www.nsf.gov/ ) in documenting, preserving, and disseminating their research results. We register datasets in the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD http://gcmd.nasa.gov/portals/amd/ ) to comply with the Antarctic Treaty (http://www.ats.aq/e/ats.htm ); facilitate submission of datasets to long-term archives; and represent the U.S. in Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR http://www.scar.org/data-products/scadm ) activities. USAP-DC is a member of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA http://www.iedadata.org/ ) and a partner in the Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium (A2DC http://www.a2dc.org/ ).
The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) serves as the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for all Ocean Biology (OB) data produced or collected under NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This website thus serves as the primary data access portal to the NASA OB.DAAC. The links below provide a variety of methods to access the holdings of the OB.DAAC, including visual browsers that enable point-and-click access by data levels and direct access for bulk download. In agreement with partner organizations, some data access requires user registration to enable better tracking of usage metrics.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).