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Found 239 result(s)
The main goal of the ECCAD project is to provide scientific and policy users with datasets of surface emissions of atmospheric compounds, and ancillary data, i.e. data required to estimate or quantify surface emissions. The supply of ancillary data - such as maps of population density, maps of fires spots, burnt areas, land cover - could help improve and encourage the development of new emissions datasets. ECCAD offers: Access to global and regional emission inventories and ancillary data, in a standardized format Quick visualization of emission and ancillary data Rationalization of the use of input data in algorithms or emission models Analysis and comparison of emissions datasets and ancillary data Tools for the evaluation of emissions and ancillary data ECCAD is a dynamical and interactive database, providing the most up to date datasets including data used within ongoing projects. Users are welcome to add their own datasets, or have their regional masks included in order to use ECCAD tools.
The MGDS Academic Seismic Portal at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (ASP-LDEO), now part of the IEDA Data Facility, was initiated in 2003 to preserve and provide open access to multi-channel seismic (MCS) and single channel seismic (SCS) field data collected for academic research supported by the US National Science Foundation. Multi-channel data are primarily from the marine seismic vessels operated by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Modern single channel seismic data from other vessels including the R/V Palmer and USCG Healy, as well as data from portable seismic systems, are also served. The data center is operated in partnership with the Academic Seismic Portal at UTIG (http://www-udc.ig.utexas.edu/sdc/), which focuses primarily on processed multi-channel seismic data, but also serves field data from programs conducted by UTIG investigators. The development of the Academic Seismic Portal has focused on the need to recover high value MCS data from older surveys as well as to establish sustainable procedures for preservation of data from modern programs. During the final two years of R/V Ewing operations, procedures were established for routine transfer of MCS data along with navigation and acquisition parameters, and other needed documentation to the ASP. Transfer of seismic data and acquisition information is now routine for the National Marine Seismic Facility, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, which began science operations in February 2008. Data are documented and incorporated into the data system with full access restrictions protecting the scientists' rights to exclusive access during the proprietary hold period. Submission of data to the ASP helps ensure that NSF requirements for data sharing as outlined in the NSF OCE Data Policy are satisfied.
The U.S. Antarctic Program Data Center (USAP-DC) supports investigators funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF http://www.nsf.gov/ ) in documenting, preserving, and disseminating their research results. We register datasets in the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD http://gcmd.nasa.gov/portals/amd/ ) to comply with the Antarctic Treaty (http://www.ats.aq/e/ats.htm ); facilitate submission of datasets to long-term archives; and represent the U.S. in Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR http://www.scar.org/data-products/scadm ) activities. USAP-DC is a member of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA http://www.iedadata.org/ ) and a partner in the Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium (A2DC http://www.a2dc.org/ ).
The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is an international collaboration with a current focus on serving the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) and supporting climate and environmental science in general. Data is searchable and available for download at the Federated ESGF-CoG Nodes https://esgf.llnl.gov/nodes.html
The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) serves as the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for all Ocean Biology (OB) data produced or collected under NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This website thus serves as the primary data access portal to the NASA OB.DAAC. The links below provide a variety of methods to access the holdings of the OB.DAAC, including visual browsers that enable point-and-click access by data levels and direct access for bulk download. In agreement with partner organizations, some data access requires user registration to enable better tracking of usage metrics.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).
!!! December 2015: The All-Russia Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information – World Data Centre (RIHMI-WDC) has closed down WDC – Rockets, Satellites and Earth Rotation (WDC – RSER) since the topics are no longer its priorities. However, the WDS-SC is extremely pleased to learn that the data holdings of WDC – RSER have now become part of the collection of WDC – Meteorology, Obninsk (WDS Regular Member)!!! The World Data Centre for Rockets, Satellite and Rotation of the Earth is located in Obninsk in the All-Russian Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information World Data Centre (RIHMI-WDC). The task of the Centre is to collect and disseminate meteorological data and products worldwide and especially in Russia. Data are available from RIHMI-WDC site
Satellite-tracked drifting buoys ("drifters") collect measurements of upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) around the world as part of the Global Drifter Program. Drifter locations are estimated from 16-20 satellite fixes per day, per drifter. The Drifter Data Assembly Center (DAC) at NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) assembles these raw data, applies quality control procedures, and interpolates them via kriging to regular six-hour intervals. The raw observations and processed data are archived at AOML and at the Marine Environmental Data Services (MEDS) in Canada. Two types of data are available: "metadata" contains deployment location and time, time of drogue (sea anchor) loss, date of final transmission, etc. for each drifter. "Interpolated data" contains the quality-controlled, interpolated drifter observations.
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The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
>>>!!!<<<The IGETS data base at GFZ Potsdam http://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010300 continues the activities of the International Center for Earth Tides (ICET), in particular, in collecting, archiving and distributing Earth tide records from long series of gravimeters, tiltmeters, strainmeters and other geodynamic sensors. >>>!!!<<< The ICET Data Bank contains results from 360 tidal gravity stations: hourly values, main tidal waves obtained by least squares analyses, residual vectors, oceanic attraction and loading vectors. The Data Bank contains also data from tiltmeters and extensometers. ICET is responsible for the Information System and Data Center of the Global Geodynamic Project (GGP). The tasks ascribed to ICET are : to collect all available measurements of Earth tides (which is its task as World Data Centre C), to evaluate these data by convenient methods of analysis in order to reduce the very large amount of measurements to a limited number of parameters which should contain all the desired and needed geophysical information, to compare the data from different instruments and different stations distributed all over the world, evaluate their precision and accuracy from the point of view of internal errors as well as external errors, to help to solve the basic problem of calibrations and to organize reference stations or build reference calibration devices, to fill gaps in information or data as far as feasible, to build a data bank allowing immediate and easy comparison of Earth tide parameters with different Earth models and other geodetical and geophysical parameters like geographical position, Bouguer anomaly, crustal thickness and age, heat flow, ... to ensure a broad diffusion of the results and information to all interested laboratories and individual scientists.
The Natural Environment Research Council's Data Repository for Atmospheric Science and Earth Observation. The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through three data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis.
SeaDataNet is a standardized system for managing the large and diverse data sets collected by the oceanographic fleets and the automatic observation systems. The SeaDataNet infrastructure network and enhance the currently existing infrastructures, which are the national oceanographic data centres of 35 countries, active in data collection. The networking of these professional data centres, in a unique virtual data management system provide integrated data sets of standardized quality on-line. As a research infrastructure, SeaDataNet contributes to build research excellence in Europe.
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The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
The World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) collects standardized observations on changes in mass, volume, area and length of glaciers with time (glacier fluctuations), as well as statistical information on the distribution of perennial surface ice in space (glacier inventories). Such glacier fluctuation and inventory data are high priority key variables in climate system monitoring; they form a basis for hydrological modelling with respect to possible effects of atmospheric warming, and provide fundamental information in glaciology, glacial geomorphology and quaternary geology. The highest information density is found for the Alps and Scandinavia, where long and uninterrupted records are available. As a contribution to the Global Terrestrial/Climate Observing System (GTOS, GCOS), the Division of Early Warning and Assessment and the Global Environment Outlook of UNEP, and the International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO, the WGMS collects and publishes worldwide standardized glacier data.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
The Environmental Change Network is the UK’s long-term environmental monitoring and research (LTER) programme. We make regular measurements of plant and animal communities and their physical and chemical environment. Our long-term datasets are used to increase understanding of the effects of climate change, air pollution and other environmental pressures on UK ecosystems.
The International Ocean Discovery Program’s (IODP) Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) is located in the Research Park on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station, Texas. This repository stores DSDP, ODP, and IODP cores from the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, and the Southern Ocean. A satellite repository at Rutgers University houses New Jersey/Delaware land cores 150X and 174AX.
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
The California Coastal Atlas is an experiment in the creation of a new information resource for the description, analysis and understanding of natural and human processes affecting the coast of California.