Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 35 result(s)
The programme "International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange" (IODE) of the "Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission" (IOC) of UNESCO was established in 1961. Its purpose is to enhance marine research, exploitation and development, by facilitating the exchange of oceanographic data and information between participating Member States, and by meeting the needs of users for data and information products.
The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a tool to help scientists locate and obtain geologic material from sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived by participating institutions around the world. Data and images related to the samples are prepared and contributed by the institutions for access via the IMLGS and long-term archive at NGDC. Before proposing research on any sample, please contact the curator for sample condition and availability. A consortium of Curators guides the IMLGS, maintained on behalf of the group by NGDC, since 1977.
Country
The BCDC serves the research data obtained, and the data syntheses assembled, by researchers within the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research. Furthermore it is open for all interested scientists independent of institution. All data from the different disciplines (e.g. geology, oceanography, biology, model community) will be archived in a long-term repository, interconnected and made publicly available by the BCDC. BCDC has collaborations with many international data repositories and actively archives metadata and data at those ensuring quality and FAIRness. BCDC has it's main focus on services for data management for external and internal funded projects in the field of climate research, provides data management plans and ensures that data is archived accordingly according to the best practices in the field. The data management services rank from project work for small external funded project to top-of-the-art data management services for research infrastructures on the ESFRI roadmap (e.g. RI ICOS – Integrated Carbon Observation System) and for provides products and services for Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Services. In addition BCDC is advising various communities on data management services e.g. IOC UNESCO, OECD, IAEA and various funding agencies. BCDC will become an Associated Data Unit (ADU) under IODE, International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, a worldwide network that operates under the auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO and aims at becoming a part of ICSU World Data System.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) operates at the Seismological Laboratory at Caltech and is the primary archive of seismological data for southern California. The 1932-to-present Caltech/USGS catalog maintained by the SCEDC is the most complete archive of seismic data for any region in the United States. Our mission is to maintain an easily accessible, well-organized, high-quality, searchable archive for research in seismology and earthquake engineering.
Country
The arctic data archive system (ADS) collects observation data and modeling products obtained by various Japanese research projects and gives researchers to access the results. By centrally managing a wide variety of Arctic observation data, we promote the use of data across multiple disciplines. Researchers use these integrated databases to clarify the mechanisms of environmental change in the atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and cryosphere. That ADS will be provide an opportunity of collaboration between modelers and field scientists, can be expected.
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.
The World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) collects standardized observations on changes in mass, volume, area and length of glaciers with time (glacier fluctuations), as well as statistical information on the distribution of perennial surface ice in space (glacier inventories). Such glacier fluctuation and inventory data are high priority key variables in climate system monitoring; they form a basis for hydrological modelling with respect to possible effects of atmospheric warming, and provide fundamental information in glaciology, glacial geomorphology and quaternary geology. The highest information density is found for the Alps and Scandinavia, where long and uninterrupted records are available. As a contribution to the Global Terrestrial/Climate Observing System (GTOS, GCOS), the Division of Early Warning and Assessment and the Global Environment Outlook of UNEP, and the International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO, the WGMS collects and publishes worldwide standardized glacier data.
The International Ocean Discovery Program’s (IODP) Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) is located in the Research Park on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station, Texas. This repository stores DSDP, ODP, and IODP cores from the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, and the Southern Ocean. A satellite repository at Rutgers University houses New Jersey/Delaware land cores 150X and 174AX.
DesignSafe-ci.org will provide a comprehensive environment for experimental, theoretical, and computational engineering and science, providing a place not only to steward data from its creation through archive, but also the workspace in which to understand, analyze, collaborate and publish that data. At the heart of the cyberinfrastructure, the Data Depot is the central shared data repository that supports the full research lifecycle, from data creation to analysis to curation and publication. The Data Depot will accept any data the user wishes to supply into a local workspace, even if the data type is unknown or only partial metadata is provided. The Discovery Workspace will be a web-based environment that provides researchers with access to data analysis tools, computational simulation tools, visualization tools, educational tools, and user-contributed tools within the cloud to support research workflows, learning, and discovery. The Reconnaissance Integration Portal will be the main access point to data collected during the reconnaissance of windstorm and earthquake events.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
Paleoclimatology data are derived from natural sources such as tree rings, ice cores, corals, and ocean and lake sediments. These proxy climate data extend the archive of weather and climate information hundreds to millions of years. The data include geophysical or biological measurement time series and some reconstructed climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. NCEI provides the paleoclimatology data and information scientists need to understand natural climate variability and future climate change. We also operate the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, which archives and distributes data contributed by scientists around the world.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
Welcome to the home page of the Rutgers/New Jersey Geological and Water Survey Core Repository. We are an official repository of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), hosting Legs 150X and 174AX onshore cores drilled as part of the NJ/Mid-Atlantic Transect, and the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS). Cores from other ODP/IODP repositories are available through ODP. In addition to ODP/IODP cores, we are the repository for: - 1.) 6668 m of Newark Basin Drilling Project Triassic cores (e.g., Olsen, Kent, et al. 1996) - 2.) 5182 m of the Army Corps of Engineers Passaic Tunnel Project Jurassic cores - 3.) 457 m of post-impact cores from the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Hole - 4.) Cores obtained from the Northern North Atlantic as part of the IODP Expedition 303/306 - 5.) Cores from various rift and drift basins on the eastern and Gulf Coasts of the U.S. - 6.) Geological samples from the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS) and United States Geological Survey (USGS) including 304 m of continuous NJGWS/USGS NJ coastal plain cores.
This web site is provided by the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program as part of our effort to reduce earthquake hazard in the United States. We are part of the USGS Hazards Mission Area and are the USGS component of the congressionally established, multi-agency National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP).
USGS data and tools are the digital information in a format suitable for direct input to software that can analyze its meaning in the scientific, engineering, or business context for which the data were collected.
The MARGINS Data Portal was established in fall 2003 in response to a program call for a dedicated data system to facilitate open and timely exchange of data in support of the interdisciplinary science goals of the program. The Data Portal has been built with the primary goal of providing full cataloging, open access, and long-term preservation of data collected during MARGINS/GeoPRISMS programs. The backbone of the system is an expedition metadata catalog, which provides information on field programs (who, what, when and where), inventories of sensor data and samples, relevant metadata and the links to associated data files which reside either within the Data Portal or at distributed repositories. The system is designed to leverage all relevant existing data resources and provides a framework for a broader distributed data system.
The NSIDC Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) processes, archives, documents, and distributes data from NASA's past and current Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites and field measurement programs. The NSIDC DAAC focuses on the study of the cryosphere. The NSIDC DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Data Centers.