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The DRH is a quantitative and qualitative encyclopedia of religious history. It consists of a variety of entry types including religious group and religious place. Scholars contribute entries on their area of expertise by answering questions in standardised polls. Answers are initially coded in the binary format Yes/No or categorically, with comment boxes for qualitative comments, references and links. Experts are able to answer both Yes and No to the same question, enabling nuanced answers for specific circumstances. Media, such as photos, can also be attached to either individual questions or whole entries. The DRH captures scholarly disagreement, through fine-grained records and multiple temporally and spatially overlapping entries. Users can visualise changes in answers to questions over time and the extent of scholarly consensus or disagreement.
Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. The Codex Sinaiticus Project is an international collaboration to reunite the entire manuscript in digital form and make it accessible to a global audience for the first time. Drawing on the expertise of leading scholars, conservators and curators, the Project gives everyone the opportunity to connect directly with this famous manuscript.
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This repository contains about 500 medieval codices and manuscripts (dated from 8th to 18th century), which were a part of the BMBF-funded project eCodicology. The collection and database contains descriptional data about the manuscripts in TEI conformant XML format as well as digitized images of every codex page.
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Database of ancient sources concerning Roman Water Law. Specific legal sources, e.g. from the Corpus Iuris Civilis or the Codex Theodosianus, and literary sources, for example from Cicero, Frontinus, Hyginus, Siculus Flaccus or Vitruvius, were collected to give an overview of water related legal problems in ancient Rome. Furthermore, the aim of the database is to classify these sources into different legal topics, in order to facilitate the research for sources concerning specific questions regarding Roman Water Law.