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Found 5 result(s)
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heidICON is provided by Heidelberg University Library and is the "Virtual Slide Collection" in progress of organization of Heidelberg University. In addition to record graphic material on current interest for research and teaching, the University departments and institutes can digitize and transfer their already existing slide collections.
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Cobalt was commonly used as a colourant in the Egyptian glass industries of the 18th dynasty, dark blue glass being a regular find at palatial and settlement sites, including Amarna and Malqata. The main source of cobalt ore used during this period has been identified in the Egyptian Western Desert, around the oases of Kharga and Dakhla. The data presented here was obtained in order to better understand the chaîne opératoire of Late Bronze Age glass production and -working, in particular with regard to cobalt ore. For this purpose, chemical analysis by portable X-Ray fluorescence (pXRF) was carried out in the field on contextualised archaeological material excavated at the site of Amarna, which cannot be exported from Egypt for analysis. In addition, glass and other vitreous materials from the same site, but without a more precise archaeological context, were analysed in the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, Berlin. The results of this study demonstrate how cobalt ore from various sub-sources was used in the known workshop sites at Amarna, resulting in a deeper understanding of raw materials use and exchange across this settlemen
The DRH is a quantitative and qualitative encyclopedia of religious history. It consists of a variety of entry types including religious group and religious place. Scholars contribute entries on their area of expertise by answering questions in standardised polls. Answers are initially coded in the binary format Yes/No or categorically, with comment boxes for qualitative comments, references and links. Experts are able to answer both Yes and No to the same question, enabling nuanced answers for specific circumstances. Media, such as photos, can also be attached to either individual questions or whole entries. The DRH captures scholarly disagreement, through fine-grained records and multiple temporally and spatially overlapping entries. Users can visualise changes in answers to questions over time and the extent of scholarly consensus or disagreement.
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Based on Bowerman & Pederson’s Topological Relations Picture Series (TRPS), the author has researched the semantic space of static spatial prepositions of Hieroglyphic Ancient Egyptian (Egyptian, Afro-Asiatic), Arabic, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Russian, and Spanish. This repository publication publishes the raw data.
The collection contains computed images (ortho-photos), camera photos, and wall plans of the textual witness of the Egyptian Netherworld Book, "Book of Caverns", in the tomb of Petamenophis in the necropolis of Thebes in Egypt (TT 33).