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Found 13 result(s)
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
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The Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) contains small molecule pathways found in humans, which are presented visually. All SMPDB pathways include information on the relevant organs, subcellular compartments, protein cofactors, protein locations, metabolite locations, chemical structures and protein quaternary structures. Accompanying data includes detailed descriptions and references, providing an overview of the pathway, condition or processes depicted in each diagram.
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Stemformatics is a collaboration between the stem cell and bioinformatics community. We were motivated by the plethora of exciting cell models in the public and private domains, and the realisation that for many biologists these were mostly inaccessible. We wanted a fast way to find and visualise interesting genes in these exemplar stem cell datasets. We'd like you to explore. You'll find data from leading stem cell laboratories in a format that is easy to search, easy to visualise and easy to export.
The Progenetix database provides an overview of copy number abnormalities in human cancer from currently 32548 array and chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) experiments, as well as Whole Genome or Whole Exome Sequencing (WGS, WES) studies. The cancer profile data in Progenetix was curated from 1031 articles and represents 366 different cancer types, according to the International classification of Diseases in Oncology (ICD-O).
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
>>>!!!<<< caArray Retirement Announcement >>>!!!<<< The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) instance of the caArray database was retired on March 31st, 2015. All publicly-accessible caArray data and annotations will be archived and will remain available via FTP download https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/x/UYHeDQ and is also available at GEO http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ . >>>!!!<<< While NCI will not be able to provide technical support for the caArray software after the retirement, the source code is available on GitHub https://github.com/NCIP/caarray , and we encourage continued community development. Molecular Analysis of Brain Neoplasia (Rembrandt fine-00037) gene expression data has been loaded into ArrayExpress: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/experiments/E-MTAB-3073 >>>!!!<<< caArray is an open-source, web and programmatically accessible microarray data management system that supports the annotation of microarray data using MAGE-TAB and web-based forms. Data and annotations may be kept private to the owner, shared with user-defined collaboration groups, or made public. The NCI instance of caArray hosts many cancer-related public datasets available for download.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
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A community-based search platform. OMICtools bridges the gap between researchers and tool developers. OMICtools brings together an interactive worldwide user community, linking expert curators who submit, review and categorize tools, to users who strengthen the interface by bringing feedback and reviews.