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Found 14 result(s)
The National Science Digital Library provides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings. The NSDL collection contains structured descriptive information (metadata) about web-based educational resources held on other sites by their providers. These providers have contribute this metadata to NSDL for organized search and open access to educational resources via this website and its services.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
GRID-Geneva is a unique platform providing analyses and solutions for a wide range of environmental issues. GRID-Geneva serves primarily the needs of its three institutional partners - UNEP, the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) and the University of Geneva (UniGe) - which are linked by an ongoing, multi-year “Partnership Agreement”, along with other local-to-global stakeholders. GRID-Geneva is also a bilingual English and French centre and the key francophone link within the global GRID network of centres. GRID-Geneva is a key centre of geo-spatial know-how, with strengths in GIS, IP/remote sensing and statistical analyses, integrated through modern spatial data infrastructures and web applications. Working at the interface between scientific information and policy/decision-making, GRID-Geneva also helps to develop capacities in these fields of expertise among target audiences, countries and other groups.
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In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32, www.tr32.de), funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
DARECLIMED data repository consists of three kind of data: (a) climate, (b) water resources, and (c) energy related data. The first part, climate datasets, will include atmospheric and indirect atmospheric data, proxies and reconstructions, terrestrial and oceanic data. Land use, population, economy and development data will be added as well. Datasets can be handled and analyzed by connecting to the Live Access Server (LAS), which enables to visualize data with on-the-fly graphics, request custom subsets of variables in a choice of file formats, access background reference material about the data (metadata), and compare (difference) variables from distributed locations. Access to server is granted upon request by emailing the data repository manager.
The Met Office is the UK's National Weather Service. We have a long history of weather forecasting and have been working in the area of climate change for more than two decades. As a world leader in providing weather and climate services, we employ more than 1,800 at 60 locations throughout the world. We are recognised as one of the world's most accurate forecasters, using more than 10 million weather observations a day, an advanced atmospheric model and a high performance supercomputer to create 3,000 tailored forecasts and briefings a day. These are delivered to a huge range of customers from the Government, to businesses, the general public, armed forces, and other organisations.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.