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Found 29 result(s)
The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a tool to help scientists locate and obtain geologic material from sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived by participating institutions around the world. Data and images related to the samples are prepared and contributed by the institutions for access via the IMLGS and long-term archive at NGDC. Before proposing research on any sample, please contact the curator for sample condition and availability. A consortium of Curators guides the IMLGS, maintained on behalf of the group by NGDC, since 1977.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
The Seamount Catalog is a digital archive for bathymetric seamount maps from all the oceans that can be viewed and downloaded in various formats. This catalog contains morphological data, sample information, related grid and multibeam data files, as well as user-contributed files that all can be downloaded.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
U.S. IOOS is a vital tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. A primary focus of U.S. IOOS is integration of, and expedited access to, ocean observation data for improved decision making. The Data Management and Communication (DMAC) subsystem of U.S. IOOS serves as a central mechanism for integrating all existing and projected data sources.
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Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
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The main objective of the Bolin Centre Database is to ensure the preservation, interoperability and open access of climate research data for members of the Bolin Centre for Climate Research. The Bolin Centre Database also provides expert advice and guidance on data management. The Bolin Centre itself is a multi-disciplinary consortium in Sweden that conducts research and graduate education related to the Earth´s climate, in collaboration between Stockholm University, The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
Satellite-tracked drifting buoys ("drifters") collect measurements of upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) around the world as part of the Global Drifter Program. Drifter locations are estimated from 16-20 satellite fixes per day, per drifter. The Drifter Data Assembly Center (DAC) at NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) assembles these raw data, applies quality control procedures, and interpolates them via kriging to regular six-hour intervals. The raw observations and processed data are archived at AOML and at the Marine Environmental Data Services (MEDS) in Canada. Two types of data are available: "metadata" contains deployment location and time, time of drogue (sea anchor) loss, date of final transmission, etc. for each drifter. "Interpolated data" contains the quality-controlled, interpolated drifter observations.
GRID-Geneva is a unique platform providing analyses and solutions for a wide range of environmental issues. GRID-Geneva serves primarily the needs of its three institutional partners - UNEP, the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) and the University of Geneva (UniGe) - which are linked by an ongoing, multi-year “Partnership Agreement”, along with other local-to-global stakeholders. GRID-Geneva is also a bilingual English and French centre and the key francophone link within the global GRID network of centres. GRID-Geneva is a key centre of geo-spatial know-how, with strengths in GIS, IP/remote sensing and statistical analyses, integrated through modern spatial data infrastructures and web applications. Working at the interface between scientific information and policy/decision-making, GRID-Geneva also helps to develop capacities in these fields of expertise among target audiences, countries and other groups.
The International Ocean Discovery Program’s (IODP) Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) is located in the Research Park on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station, Texas. This repository stores DSDP, ODP, and IODP cores from the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, and the Southern Ocean. A satellite repository at Rutgers University houses New Jersey/Delaware land cores 150X and 174AX.
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Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring.
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
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The Polar Data Catalogue is an online database of metadata and data that describes, indexes and provides access to diverse data sets generated by polar researchers. These records cover a wide range of disciplines from natural sciences and policy, to health, social sciences, and more.
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>>>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada is now part of Ocean Networks Canada and this website is being phased out. Please visit us on our new website at oceannetworks.ca >>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada, the North-East Pacific Time-series Undersea Networked Experiments, is the world's first regional scale cabled deep ocean observing network. It consists of an 800km network of electro‐optic cable laid on the seabed over the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, off the coast of British Columbia. This tectonic plate serves as an exceptional natural laboratory for ocean observation and experiments. NEPTUNE Canada instruments yield continuous real‐time data and imagery from the ocean surface to beneath the seafloor, and from the coast to the deep sea. They respond to events such as earthquakes, tsunamis, fish migrations, plankton blooms, storms and volcanic eruptions. NEPTUNE Canada offers a unique and exciting approach to ocean science.
The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves and beaches along the coastlines of the United States. Since its inception in 1975, the program has produced a vast database of publicly-accessible environmental data for use by coastal engineers and planners, scientists, mariners, and marine enthusiasts. The program has also remained at the forefront of coastal monitoring, developing numerous innovations in instrumentation, system control and management, computer hardware and software, field equipment, and installation techniques.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
The National Coastal Data Development Center, a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is dedicated to building the long-term coastal data record to support environmental prediction, scientific analysis, and formulation of public policy. >>>!!!<<< For informations about the migration of data from NODC to NCEI see: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/about >>>!!!<<</index.html
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
Welcome to the home page of the Rutgers/New Jersey Geological and Water Survey Core Repository. We are an official repository of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), hosting Legs 150X and 174AX onshore cores drilled as part of the NJ/Mid-Atlantic Transect, and the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS). Cores from other ODP/IODP repositories are available through ODP. In addition to ODP/IODP cores, we are the repository for: - 1.) 6668 m of Newark Basin Drilling Project Triassic cores (e.g., Olsen, Kent, et al. 1996) - 2.) 5182 m of the Army Corps of Engineers Passaic Tunnel Project Jurassic cores - 3.) 457 m of post-impact cores from the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Hole - 4.) Cores obtained from the Northern North Atlantic as part of the IODP Expedition 303/306 - 5.) Cores from various rift and drift basins on the eastern and Gulf Coasts of the U.S. - 6.) Geological samples from the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS) and United States Geological Survey (USGS) including 304 m of continuous NJGWS/USGS NJ coastal plain cores.
PISCO researchers collect biological, chemical, and physical data about ocean ecosystems in the nearshore portions of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. Data are archived and used to create summaries and graphics, in order to ensure that the data can be used and understood by a diverse audience of managers, policy makers, scientists and the general public.
The Met Office is the UK's National Weather Service. We have a long history of weather forecasting and have been working in the area of climate change for more than two decades. As a world leader in providing weather and climate services, we employ more than 1,800 at 60 locations throughout the world. We are recognised as one of the world's most accurate forecasters, using more than 10 million weather observations a day, an advanced atmospheric model and a high performance supercomputer to create 3,000 tailored forecasts and briefings a day. These are delivered to a huge range of customers from the Government, to businesses, the general public, armed forces, and other organisations.