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The Detection of Archaeological Residues using Remote-sensing Techniques (DART) project was initiated in 2010 in order to investigate the ability of various sensors to detect archaeological features in ‘difficult’ circumstances. Concluding in September 2013, DART had the overall aim of developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying gradual changes and dynamics in sensor responses associated with surface and near-surface archaeological features under different environmental and land-management conditions.
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With ARS - Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance in Germany - the infrastructure for a nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial resistance has been established, which covers both the inpatient medical care and the ambulatory care sector. This is intended to reliable data on the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in Germany and differential statements provided by structural features of the health care and by region are possible. ARS is designed as a laboratory-based surveillance system for continuous collection of resistance data from routine for the full range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Project participants and thus data suppliers are laboratories that analyze samples of medical facilities and doctors' offices microbiologically.
The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) is a permanent archive and distribution center primarily for multiple types of digital data relating to earthquakes in central and northern California. The NCEDC is located at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, and has been accessible to users via the Internet since mid-1992. The NCEDC was formed as a joint project of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at Menlo Park in 1991, and current USGS funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for seismic network operations.