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Historic Environment Scotland was formed in October 2015 following the merger between Historic Scotland and The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. Historic Environment Scotland is the lead public body established to investigate, care for and promote Scotland’s historic environment. We lead and enable Scotland’s first historic environment strategy Our Place in Time, which sets out how our historic environment will be managed. It ensures our historic environment is cared for, valued and enhanced, both now and for future generations.
The Twenty-07 Study was set up in 1986 in order to investigate the reasons for differences in health by socio-economic circumstances, gender, area of residence, age, ethnic group, and family type. 4510 people are being followed for 20 years. The initial wave of data collection took place in 1987/8, when respondents were aged 15, 35 and 55. The final wave of data collection took place in 2007/08 when respondents were aged 35, 55 and 75. In this way the Twenty-07 Study provides us with unique opportunities to investigate both the changes in people's lives over 20 years and how they affect their health, and the differences in people's experiences at the same ages 20 years apart, and how these have different effects on their health.
The MRC National Survey of Health and Development 1946 (NSHD) was the first ever British birth cohort study. It has collected information from birth to the current day on the health and life circumstances of five and a half thousand men and women born during a week in March 1946 throughout England, Wales, and Scotland. The study explores differences in child development by factors like social class, biological factors, health and education. Due to the length of the study it has developed into a study of ageing.