Filter

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 19 result(s)
This database contains references to publications that include numerical data, general information, comments, and reviews on atomic line broadening and shifts, and is part of the collection of the NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/grp01/asdc_info.cfm
This is a compilation of approximately 923,000 allowed, intercombination and forbidden atomic transitions with wavelengths in the range from 0.5 Å to 1000 µm. It's primary intention is to allow the identification of observed atomic absorption or emission features. The wavelengths in this list are all calculated from the difference between the energy of the upper and lower level of the transition. No attempt has been made to include observed wavelengths. Most of the atomic energy level data have been taken from the Atomic Spectra Database provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
This database contains references to publications that include numerical data, comments, and reviews on atomic transition probabilities (oscillator strengths, line strengths, or radiative lifetimes), and is part of the collection of the NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData/datarefs/datarefs_search_form.html
The Atomic Data for Astrophysics server provides links to basic atomic data required for calculation of the ionization state of astrophysical plasmas and for quantitative spectroscopy.
Physical Reference Data compiles physical data and biblographic sources: Physical constants, atomic spectroscopy data, molecular spectroscopic data, X-Ray and Gamma-Ray data, nuclear physics data etc.
The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) contains data for radiative transitions and energy levels in atoms and atomic ions. Data are included for observed transitions and energy levels of most of the known chemical elements. ASD contains data on spectral lines with wavelengths from about 0.2 Å (ångströms) to 60 m (meters). For many lines, ASD includes radiative transition probabilities. The energy level data include the ground states and ionization energies for all spectra. Except where noted, the data have been critically evaluated by NIST. For most spectra, wavelengths, transition probabilities, relative intensities, and energy levels are integrated, so that all the available information for a given transition is incorporated under a single listing. For classified lines, in addition to the observed wavelength, ASD includes the Ritz wavelength, which is the wavelength derived from the energy levels. The Ritz wavelengths are usually more precise than the observed ones. Line lists containing classified lines can be ordered by either multiplet (for a given spectrum) or wavelength. For some spectra, ASD includes lists of prominent lines with wavelengths and relative intensities but without energy-level classifications.
The Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD) is a collection of atomic and molecular transition parameters of astronomical interest. VALD offers tools for selecting subsets of lines for typical astrophysical applications: line identification, preparing for spectroscopic observations, chemical composition and radial velocity measurements, model atmosphere calculations etc.
The ADAS Project is a self-funding (i.e. funded by participants) project consisting of most major fusion laboratories along with other astrophysical and university groups. As an implementation, it is an interconnected set of computer codes and data collections for modelling the radiating properties of ions and atoms in plasmas. It can address plasmas ranging from the interstellar medium through the solar atmosphere and laboratory thermonuclear fusion devices to technological plasmas. ADAS assists in the analysis and interpretation of spectral emission and supports detailed plasma models.
In February 1986 the NIST measurements were communicated to appropriate astronomers for use in ground-based testing and calibration programs for the GHRS, and in 1990 the NIST group published the new wavelengths for about 3000 lines in the Supplement Series of the Astrophysical Journal. The full report on the NIST measurements in the form of a complete and detailed atlas of the platinum/neon spectrum presented in this special issue of the Journal of Research of NIST will be highly useful to a wide range of scientists.
The information accumulated in the SPECTR-W3 ADB contains over 450,000 records and includes factual experimental and theoretical data on ionization potentials, energy levels, wavelengths, radiation transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, and (optionally) the parameters of analytical approximations of electron-collisional cross-sections and rates for atoms and ions. Those data were extracted from publications in physical journals, proceedings of the related conferences, special-purpose publications on atomic data, and provided directly by authors. The information is supplied with references to the original sources and comments, elucidating the details of experimental measurements or calculations, where necessary and available. To date, the SPECTR-W3 ADB is the largest factual database in the world containing the information on spectral properties of multicharged ions.
The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle and photon reactions have been covered less extensively.
Country
The WURM project is a database of computed Raman and infrared spectra and other physical properties for minerals. The calculations are performed within the framework of the density-functional theory and the density-functional perturbation theory. The database is freely available for teaching and research purposes and is presented in a web-based format, hosted on the http://www.wurm.info web site. It provides the crystal structure, the parameters of the calculations, the dielectric properties, the Raman spectra with both peak positions and intensities and the infrared spectra with peak positions for minerals. It shows the atomic displacement patterns for all the zone-center vibrational modes and the associated Raman tensors. The web presentation is user friendly and highly oriented toward the end user, with a strong educational component in mind. A set of visualization tools ensures the observation of the crystal structure, the vibrational pattern, and the different spectra. Further developments include elastic and optical properties of minerals.
HITRAN is an acronym for high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database. The HITRAN compilation of the SAO (HIgh resolution TRANmission molecular absorption database) is used for predicting and simulating transmission and emission of light in atmospheres. It is the world-standard database in molecular spectroscopy. The journal article describing it is the most cited reference in the geosciences. There are presently about 5000 HITRAN users world-wide. Its associated database HITEMP (high-temperature spectroscopic absorption parameters) is accessible by the HITRAN website.