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Found 16 result(s)
The CDHA assists researchers to create, document, and distribute public use microdata on health and aging for secondary analysis. Major research themes include: midlife development and aging; economics of population aging; inequalities in health and aging; international comparative studies of health and aging; and the investigation of linkages between social-demographic and biomedical research in population aging. The CDHA is one of fourteen demography centers on aging sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.
The Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) started as a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. MHAS is nationally representative of the 13 million Mexicans born prior to 1951. The survey has national and urban/rural representation. The baseline survey, in 2001, included a nationally representative sample of Mexicans aged 50 and over and their spouse/partners regardless of their age. A direct interview was sought with each individual and proxy interviews were obtained when poor health or temporary absence precluded a direct interview. The sample was distributed in all 32 states of the country in urban and rural areas. Households in the six states which account for 40% of all migrants to the U.S. were over-sampled. A sub-sample was selected to obtain anthropometric measures.
NACDA acquires and preserves data relevant to gerontological research, processing as needed to promote effective research use, disseminates them to researchers, and facilitates their use. By preserving and making available the largest library of electronic data on aging in the United States, NACDA offers opportunities for secondary analysis on major issues of scientific and policy relevance
The Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) at the VU University and VU University Medical Centre is initiated by the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports in 1991 to determine predictors and consequences of ageing. LASA focuses on, physical, emotional, cognitive and social functioning in late life, the connections between these aspects, and the changes that occur in the course of time
BADGIR is an on-line data archive at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. From this portal you can browse or search data documentation (e.g., metadata, codebooks) and univariate summary statistics (e.g., mean, frequency counts). The database contains documented survey results from various survey-research projects in the US, Central America, and South America. Some historical datasets also (e.g. of slave-trade records).
The Gateway to Global Aging Data is a platform for population survey data on aging around the world. This site offers a digital library of survey questions, a search engine for finding comparable questions across surveys, and identically defined variables for cross-country analysis. The Survey Meta Data Repository provides Health and Retirement Study metadata of family surveys. Survey Meta Data Repository primarily provides access to survey metadata so researchers can compare survey formats, types and identically defined variables. Additional resources include tools for cross-country analysis, general statistics by country and year, survey question library, and tools for comparing questions across the surveys. Datasets are in Stata format; users must register and request datasets.
The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, genetic information and health care expenditures.
The University has followed all of the children born in Aberdeen in 1921, 1936, and 1950-1956 as they grow and age. Collectively these groups are known as the ABERDEEN BIRTH COHORTS, and are a jewel in the crown of Scottish health research and have helped to advance our understanding of aging well. The Children of the 1950s study is a population-based resource for the study of biological and social influences on health across the life-course and between generations.
Country
The FDZ-DZA (Forschungsdatenzentrum DZA) is a facility of the German Centre of Gerontology (Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, DZA) and has received accreditation as research data center DZA by the German Data Forum (RatSWD). Its main task is to make data of the German Ageing Survey DEAS and the German Survey on Volunteering (FWS) accessible to researchers by providing user-friendly Scientific Use Files (SUF), documentation of the contents and instruments as well support for scholars using the data.
The National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) offers free web access to large collections of de-identified physiological signals and clinical data elements collected in well-characterized research cohorts and clinical trials.
The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is a multidisciplinary and cross-national panel database of micro data on health, socio-economic status and social and family networks of more than 85,000 individuals (approximately 150,000 interviews) from 19 European countries (+Israel) aged 50 or over.
The Human Mortality Database (HMD) was created to provide detailed mortality and population data to researchers, students, journalists, policy analysts, and others interested in the history of human longevity. The Human Mortality Database (HMD) contains original calculations of death rates and life tables for national populations (countries or areas), as well as the input data used in constructing those tables. The input data consist of death counts from vital statistics, plus census counts, birth counts, and population estimates from various sources.
ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 250,000 files of research in the social and behavioral sciences. It hosts 21 specialized collections of data in education, aging, criminal justice, substance abuse, terrorism, and other fields. ICPSR advances and expands social and behavioral research, acting as a global leader in data stewardship and providing rich data resources and responsive educational opportunities for present and future generations.
The Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) is a multi-center, longitudinal, prospective observational study of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The overall aim of the OAI is to develop a public domain research resource to facilitate the scientific evaluation of biomarkers for osteoarthritis as potential surrogate endpoints for disease onset and progression.
The Whitehall II study was established to explore the relationship between socio-economic status, stress and cardiovascular disease. A cohort of 10,308 participants aged 35-55, of whom 3,413 were women and 6,895 men, was recruited from the British Civil Service in 1985. Since this first wave of data collection, self-completion questionnaires and clinical data have been collected from the cohort every two to five years with a high level of participation. Data collection is intended to continue until 2030.
A national study on socioeconomics and family health over lifetimes and across generations funded by National Science Foundation (NSF). It is the longest running longitudinal household survey in the world, started in 1968 with a nationally representative sample of over 18,000 individuals living in 5,000 families in the United States. It is recognizing the importance of the socioeconomic data, available on this website without cost to researchers and analysts.