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Found 13 result(s)
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Oral Cancer Gene Database is an initiative of the Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer, Navi Mumbai. The present database, version II, consists of 374 genes. It is developed as a user friendly site that would provide the scientist, information and external links from one place. The database is accessed through a list of all genes, and Keyword Search using gene name or gene symbol, chromosomal location, CGH (in %), and molecular weight. Interaction Network shows the interaction between genes for particular biological processes and molecular functions.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
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HADb provides a complete and an up-to-date list of human genes and proteins involved directly or indirectly in autophagy as described in literature.
BioGRID ORCS is an open repository of CRISPR screens compiled through comprehensive curation efforts. The current index is version 1.0.3 and searches more than 49 publications and 58,161 genes to return more than 895 CRISPR screens from 3 major model organism species and 629 cell lines. All screen data are freely provided through our search index and available via download in a wide variety of standardized formats.
HumanCyc provides an encyclopedic reference on human metabolic pathways. It provides a zoomable human metabolic map diagram, and it has been used to generate a steady-state quantitative model of human metabolism. 2016: Subscriptions are now required to access HumanCyc. For more information on obtaining a subscription, click here: http://www.phoenixbioinformatics.org/biocyc#product-biocyc-subscription
NetPath is currently one of the largest open-source repository of human signaling pathways that is all set to become a community standard to meet the challenges in functional genomics and systems biology. Signaling networks are the key to deciphering many of the complex networks that govern the machinery inside the cell. Several signaling molecules play an important role in disease processes that are a direct result of their altered functioning and are now recognized as potential therapeutic targets. Understanding how to restore the proper functioning of these pathways that have become deregulated in disease, is needed for accelerating biomedical research. This resource is aimed at demystifying the biological pathways and highlights the key relationships and connections between them. Apart from this, pathways provide a way of reducing the dimensionality of high throughput data, by grouping thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites at functional level into just several hundreds of pathways for an experiment. Identifying the active pathways that differ between two conditions can have more explanatory power than just a simple list of differentially expressed genes and proteins.
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Using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and microarrays, we are examining total mRNA populations in all developmental stages, both in whole worms and in specific cells and tissues. In addition, we are building promoter::GFP constructs to monitor gene expression in transgenic worms, focusing on C. elegans genes that have human orthologues. Also available are web-based PCR primer design tools, and access to information about our C. elegans Fosmid library.
The repository facilitates computation of a wide range of biosystem data. It also connects biosystem data with associated literature throughout the Entrez system.
Tthe Lipidomics Gateway - a free, comprehensive website for researchers interested in lipid biology, provided by the LIPID MAPS (Lipid Metabolites and Pathways Strategy) Consortium. The LIPID MAPS Lipidomics Gateway provides a rich collection of information and resources to help you stay abreast of the latest developments in this rapidly expanding field. LIPID Metabolites And Pathways Strategy (LIPID MAPS®) is a multi-institutional effort created in 2003 to identify and quantitate, using a systems biology approach and sophisticated mass spectrometers, all of the major — and many minor — lipid species in mammalian cells, as well as to quantitate the changes in these species in response to perturbation. The ultimate goal of our research is to better understand lipid metabolism and the active role lipids play in diabetes, stroke, cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's and other lipid-based diseases in order to facilitate development of more effective treatments. Since our inception, we have made great strides toward defining the "lipidome" (an inventory of the thousands of individual lipid molecular species) in the mouse macrophage. We have also worked to make lipid analysis easier and more accessible for the broader scientific community and to advance a robust research infrastructure for the international research community. We share new lipidomics findings and methods, hold annual meetings open to all interested investigators, and are exploring joint efforts to extend the use of these powerful new methods to new applications
It is an interactive website offering access to genome sequence data from a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and major model organisms, integrated with a large collection of aligned annotations. The Browser is a graphical viewer optimized to support fast interactive performance and is an open-source, web-based tool suite built on top of a MySQL database for rapid visualization, examination, and querying of the data at many levels.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
In early 2010 we updated the site to facilitate more rapid transfer of our data to the public database and focus our efforts on the core mission of providing expression pattern images to the research community. The original database http://www.fruitfly.org/index.html reproduced functions available on FlyBase, complicating our updates by the requirement to re-synchronize with FlyBase updates. Our expression reports on the new site still link to FlyBase gene reports, but we no longer reproduce FlyBase functions and therefore can update expression data on an ongoing basis instead of more infrequent major releases. All the functions relating to the expression patterns remain and we soon will add an option to search expression patterns by image similarity, in addition to annotation term searches. In a transitional phase we will leave both the old and the new sites up, but the newer data (post Release 2) will appear only on the new website. We welcome any feedback or requests for additional features. - The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.