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Found 19 result(s)
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.
The VDC is a public, web-based search engine for accessing worldwide earthquake strong ground motion data. While the primary focus of the VDC is on data of engineering interest, it is also an interactive resource for scientific research and government and emergency response professionals.
SCEC's mission includes gathering data on earthquakes, both in Southern California and other locales; integrate the information into a comprehensive understanding of earthquake phenomena; and communicate useful knowledge for reducing earthquake risk to society at large. The SCEC community consists of more than 600 scientists from 16 core institutions and 47 additional participating institutions. SCEC is funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Geological Survey.
Country
The National Earthquake DataBase (NEDB) comprises a number of separate databases that together act as the national repository for all raw seismograph data, measurements, and derived parameters arising from the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN), the Yellowknife Seismological Array (YKA), previous regional telemetered networks in eastern and western Canada (ECTN, WCTN), local telemetered networks (CLTN, SLTN), the Regional Analogue Network, and the former Standard Seismograph Network (CSN). It supports the efforts of Earthquakes Canada in Canadian seismicity monitoring, global seismic monitoring, verification of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and international data exchange. It also supports the [Nuclear Explosion Monitoring project][NEM].
This web site is provided by the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program as part of our effort to reduce earthquake hazard in the United States. We are part of the USGS Hazards Mission Area and are the USGS component of the congressionally established, multi-agency National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP).
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>>>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada is now part of Ocean Networks Canada and this website is being phased out. Please visit us on our new website at oceannetworks.ca >>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada, the North-East Pacific Time-series Undersea Networked Experiments, is the world's first regional scale cabled deep ocean observing network. It consists of an 800km network of electro‐optic cable laid on the seabed over the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, off the coast of British Columbia. This tectonic plate serves as an exceptional natural laboratory for ocean observation and experiments. NEPTUNE Canada instruments yield continuous real‐time data and imagery from the ocean surface to beneath the seafloor, and from the coast to the deep sea. They respond to events such as earthquakes, tsunamis, fish migrations, plankton blooms, storms and volcanic eruptions. NEPTUNE Canada offers a unique and exciting approach to ocean science.
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AGS delivers geoscience in several key areas, including surficial mapping, bedrock mapping, geological modelling, resource evaluation (hydrocarbons, minerals), groundwater, and geological hazards. We also are responsible for maintaining the Alberta Table of Formations and providing geoscience outreach to stakeholders ranging from professional colleagues and academia to the general public.
The mission of the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) is to determine rapidly the location and size of all destructive earthquakes worldwide and to immediately disseminate this information to concerned national and international agencies, scientists, and the general public. The NEIC compiles and maintains an extensive, global seismic database on earthquake parameters and their effects that serves as a solid foundation for basic and applied earth science research. The NEIC maintained until 2012 the former 'World Data Center for Seismology'.
The European Database of Seismogenic Faults (EDSF) was compiled in the framework of the EU Project SHARE, Work Package 3, Task 3.2. EDSF includes only faults that are deemed to be capable of generating earthquakes of magnitude equal to or larger than 5.5 and aims at ensuring a homogeneous input for use in ground-shaking hazard assessment in the Euro-Mediterranean area. Several research institutions participated in this effort with the contribution of many scientists (see the Database section for a full list). The EDSF database and website are hosted and maintained by INGV.
AHEAD, the European Archive of Historical Earthquake Data 1000-1899, is a distributed archive aiming at preserving, inventorying and making available, to investigators and other users, data sources on the earthquake history of Europe, such as papers, reports, Macroseismic Data Points (MDPs), parametric catalogues, and so on.
Country
Among the basic tasks of WDC for Geophysics, Beijing there is collection, handling and storage of science data and giving access to it for usage both in science research and study process. That includes remote access to own information resources for the scientists from the universities and institutions.
The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) is a permanent archive and distribution center primarily for multiple types of digital data relating to earthquakes in central and northern California. The NCEDC is located at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, and has been accessible to users via the Internet since mid-1992. The NCEDC was formed as a joint project of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at Menlo Park in 1991, and current USGS funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for seismic network operations.
The BGS is a data-rich organisation with over 400 datasets in its care; including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives. Our data is managed by the National Geoscience Data Centre.
The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) operates at the Seismological Laboratory at Caltech and is the primary archive of seismological data for southern California. The 1932-to-present Caltech/USGS catalog maintained by the SCEDC is the most complete archive of seismic data for any region in the United States. Our mission is to maintain an easily accessible, well-organized, high-quality, searchable archive for research in seismology and earthquake engineering.
EarthScope was a program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) that has deployed thousands of seismic, GPS, and other geophysical instruments to study the structure and evolution of the North American continent and the processes that cause earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. EarthScope was an Earth science program to explore the 4-dimensional structure of the North American continent. The EarthScope Program provides a framework for broad, integrated studies across the Earth sciences, including research on fault properties and the earthquake process, strain transfer, magmatic and hydrous fluids in the crust and mantle, plate boundary processes, large-scale continental deformation, continental structure and evolution, and composition and structure of the deep Earth. In addition, EarthScope offers a centralized forum for Earth science education at all levels and an excellent opportunity to develop cyberinfrastructure to integrate, distribute, and analyze diverse data set.
The USGS Alaska Region has the largest geographic extent of the seven regional units within the USGS and represents a dynamic landscape of great natural wonder. It is a transforming landscape shaped by volcanoes, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers and a strategic landscape of yet untapped mineral and energy resources. The Region conducts research to help inform management of the extensive national parks and wildlife refuges of the far north and the international birds, fish, and marine mammals that migrate to these lands and waters; informs national Arctic energy policy through research on the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf; and provides science to understand, help respond to and mitigate impacts from natural hazards. This work is accomplished in part by the Region's two Science Centers headquartered in Anchorage, the Alaska Science Center and the Volcano Science Center.
Strong-motion data of engineering and scientific importance from the United States and other seismically active countries are served through the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data(CESMD). The CESMD now automatically posts strong-motion data from an increasing number of seismic stations in California within a few minutes following an earthquake as an InternetQuick Report(IQR). As appropriate,IQRs are updated by more comprehensive Internet Data Reports that include reviewed versions of the data and maps showing, for example, the finite fault rupture along with the distribution of recording stations. Automated processing of strong-motion data will be extended to post the strong-motion records of the regional seismic networks of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) outside California.
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GEOFON seeks to facilitate cooperation in seismological research and earthquake and tsunami hazard mitigation by providing rapid transnational access to seismological data and source parameters of large earthquakes, and keeping these data accessible in the long term. It pursues these aims by operating and maintaining a global network of permanent broadband stations in cooperation with local partners, facilitating real time access to data from this network and those of many partner networks and plate boundary observatories, providing a permanent and secure archive for seismological data. It also archives and makes accessible data from temporary experiments carried out by scientists at German universities and institutions, thereby fostering cooperation and encouraging the full exploitation of all acquired data and serving as the permanent archive for the Geophysical Instrument Pool at Potsdam (GIPP). It also organises the data exchange of real-time and archived data with partner institutions and international centres.
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.