Filter

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 8 result(s)
A curated database of mutations and polymorphisms associated with Lafora Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy. The Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy mutation and polymorphism database is a collection of hand curated mutation and polymorphism data for the EPM2A and EPM2B (NHLRC1) from publicly available literature: databases and unpublished data. The database is continuously updated with information from in-house experimental data as well as data from published research studies.
Blackfynn Discover is a repository for Neurology and Neuroscience datasets. This repository, funded by DARPA, the NIH, and others, provides a user-friendly solution for publishing large, complex datasets is a scalable and sustainable way. The platform aims to make data available in a meaningful way and to drive adoption of cloud-based analysis over large datasets.
Country
BioGrid Australia Limited operates a federated data sharing platform for collaborative translational health and medical research providing a secure infrastructure that advances health research by linking privacy-protected and ethically approved data among a wide network of health collaborators. BioGrid links real-time de-identified health data across institutions, jurisdictions and diseases to assist researchers and clinicians improve their research and clinical outcomes. The web-based infrastructure provides ethical access while protecting both privacy and intellectual property.
HumanCyc provides an encyclopedic reference on human metabolic pathways. It provides a zoomable human metabolic map diagram, and it has been used to generate a steady-state quantitative model of human metabolism. 2016: Subscriptions are now required to access HumanCyc. For more information on obtaining a subscription, click here: http://www.phoenixbioinformatics.org/biocyc#product-biocyc-subscription
PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes databases of multi-parameter cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging.
Content type(s)
Country
The Centre for Applied Genomics hosts a variety of databases related to ongoing supported projects. Curation of these databases is performed in-house by TCAG Bioinformatics staff. The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database, The Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database, TThe Lafora Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy Mutation and Polymorphism Database are included. Large Scale Genomics Research resources include, the Database of Genomic Variants, The Chromosome 7 Annotation Project, The Human Genome Segmental Duplication Database, and the Non-Human Segmental Duplication Database
ModelDB is a curated database of published models in the broad domain of computational neuroscience. It addresses the need for access to such models in order to evaluate their validity and extend their use. It can handle computational models expressed in any textual form, including procedural or declarative languages (e.g. C++, XML dialects) and source code written for any simulation environment. The model source code doesn't even have to reside inside ModelDB; it just has to be available from some publicly accessible online repository or WWW site.