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Found 14 result(s)
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The Babylonian astronomical diaries comprise a group of cuneiform texts which record natural events in time spans from months to a whole year
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
The World Ocean Database (WOD) is a collection of scientifically quality-controlled ocean profile and plankton data that includes measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorophyll, alkalinity, pH, pCO2, TCO2, Tritium, Δ13Carbon, Δ14Carbon, Δ18Oxygen, Freon, Helium, Δ3Helium, Neon, and plankton. WOD contains all data of "World Data Service Oceanography" (WDS-Oceanography).
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken.
This centre receives and archives precipitation chemistry data and complementary information from stations around the world. Data archived by this centre are accessible via connections with the WDCPC database. Freely available data from regional and national programmes with their own Web sites are accessible via links to these sites. The WDCPC is one of six World Data Centres in the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). The focus on precipitation chemistry is described in the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme. Guidance on all aspects of collecting precipitation for chemical analysis is provided in the Manual for the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme (WMO-GAW Report No. 160).
CDAAC is responsible for processing the science data received from COSMIC. This data is currently being processed not long after the data is received, i.e. approximately eighty percent of radio occultation profiles are delivered to operational weather centers within 3 hours of observation as well as in a more accurate post-processed mode (within 8 weeks of observation).
The Precipitation Processing System (PPS) evolved from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Science Data and Information System (TSDIS). The purpose of the PPS is to process, analyze and archive data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, partner satellites and the TRMM mission. The PPS also supports TRMM by providing validation products from TRMM ground radar sites. All GPM, TRMM and Partner public data products are available to the science community and the general public from the TRMM/GPM FTP Data Archive. Please note that you need to register to be able to access this data. Registered users can also search for GPM, partner and TRMM data, order custom subsets and set up subscriptions using our PPS Data Products Ordering Interface (STORM)
MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (originally known as EOS AM-1) and Aqua (originally known as EOS PM-1) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. Terra MODIS and Aqua MODIS are viewing the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands, or groups of wavelengths (see MODIS Technical Specifications). These data will improve our understanding of global dynamics and processes occurring on the land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. MODIS is playing a vital role in the development of validated, global, interactive Earth system models able to predict global change accurately enough to assist policy makers in making sound decisions concerning the protection of our environment.
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through managing data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis. The CEDA Archive operates the atmospheric and earth observation data centre functions on behalf of NERC for the UK atmospheric science and earth observation communities. It covers climate, composition, observations and NWP data as well as various earth observation datasets, including airborne and satellite data and imagery. Prior to November 2016 these functions were operted by CEDA under the titles of the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) and the NERC Earth Observation Data Centre (NEODC). CEDA also operates the UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC), which curates and provides access to archives of data from the upper atmosphere, ionosphere and Earth's solar environment.