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Found 25 result(s)
Argo is an international programme using autonomous floats to collect temperature, salinity and current data in the ice-free oceans. It is teamed with the Jason ocean satellite series.Argo will soon reach its target of 3000 floats delivering data within 24 hours to researchers and operational centres worldwide. 23 countries contribute floats to Argo and many others help with float deployments. Argo has revolutionized the collection of information from inside the oceans. ARGO Project is organized in regional and national Centers with a Project Office, an Information Center (AIC) and 2 Global Data Centers (GDAC), at the United States and at France. Each DAC submits regularly all its new files to both USGODAE and Coriolis GDACs.The whole Argo data set is available in real time and delayed mode from the global data centres (GDACs). The internet addresses are: • http://www.usgodae.org/argo/argo.html • http://www.argodatamgt.org .
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) site offers operational data in near-real time and historic contexts. Focus is on tides and currents but also includes information on harmful algal blooms and weather, etc. Data access is made possible through geopspatial web interfaces as well as OPeNDAP services, etc.
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
The CCHDO's primary mission is to deliver the highest possible quality global CTD and hydrographic data to users. These data are a product of decades of observations related to the physical characteristics of ocean waters carried out during GO-SHIP, WOCE, CLIVAR and numerous other oceanographic research programs. Whenever possible we provide these data in three easy-to-use formats: WHP-Exchange (which we recommend for data submissions to the CCHDO), WOCE, and netCDF. The CCHDO also manages public and non-public CTD data to be used for the global Argo and OceanSITES programs.
Satellite-tracked drifting buoys ("drifters") collect measurements of upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) around the world as part of the Global Drifter Program. Drifter locations are estimated from 16-20 satellite fixes per day, per drifter. The Drifter Data Assembly Center (DAC) at NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) assembles these raw data, applies quality control procedures, and interpolates them via kriging to regular six-hour intervals. The raw observations and processed data are archived at AOML and at the Marine Environmental Data Services (MEDS) in Canada. Two types of data are available: "metadata" contains deployment location and time, time of drogue (sea anchor) loss, date of final transmission, etc. for each drifter. "Interpolated data" contains the quality-controlled, interpolated drifter observations.
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China Meteorological Data Service Center, an upgraded system of the meteorological data sharing network, is an important component of the underlying national science and technology platform and a main portal application system of meteorological cloud. It is an authoritative and unified shared service platform for China Meteorological Administration to open its meteorological data resources to domestic and global users, and a data supporting platform for China to open its meteorological service market and promote the sharing and efficient application of meteorological information resources as a new meteorological service system. The comprehensive meteorological database provide online and offline shared services, the existing data types including global upper-air sounding data, surface observations, ocean observations, numerical forecast products, agro-meteorological data of ground observation data encryption, aircraft soundings, numerical weather prediction analysis field data, GPS-Met, Storm 2 No, GOES-9 satellite data, soil moisture, aircraft reported sandstorm monitoring, TOVS, ATOVS, wind profilers, satellite detection information.
The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project is a research and development project focusing on global air-sea heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes. The project is committed to produce high-quality, long-term, global ocean surface forcing datasets from the late 1950s to the present to serve the needs of the ocean and climate communities on the characterization, attribution, modeling, and understanding of variability and long-term change in the atmosphere and the oceans. - Links überprüft 14.6.2017 Re
ICOS Carbon Portal is the data portal of the Integrated Carbon Observation System. It provides observational data from the state of the carbon cycle in Europe and the world. The Carbon Portal is the data center of the ICOS infrastructure. ICOS will collect greenhouse gas concentration and fluxes observations from three separate networks, all these observations are carried out to support research to help us understand how the Earth’s greenhouse gas balance works, because there are still many and large uncertainties!
The National Oceanographic Data Center includes the National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC) and the NOAA Central Library, which are integrated to provide access to the world's most comprehensive sources of marine environmental data and information. NODC maintains and updates a national ocean archive with environmental data acquired from domestic and foreign activities and produces products and research from these data which help monitor global environmental changes. These data include physical, biological and chemical measurements derived from in situ oceanographic observations, satellite remote sensing of the oceans, and ocean model simulations. >>>!!!<<< For informations about the migration of data from NODC to NCEI see: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/about/index.html >>>!!!<<<
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
The WDCGG archives measurement data for greenhouse and related gases in the atmosphere and the ocean (77 gaseous species as of 31 December 2009). The data are classified into six categories according to the observation platforms or methods used (see WDCGG Data Submission and Dissemination Guide). Air observation at stationary platform Air observation by mobile platforms (e.g. aircraft, ships, etc.) Vertical profile observation of air (e.g. multi-height observation using a tower) Hydrographic sampling observation by ships Ice core observation Observation of surface seawater and overlying air
NCEP delivers national and global weather, water, climate and space weather guidance, forecasts, warnings and analyses to its Partners and External User Communities. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), an arm of the NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), is comprised of nine distinct Centers, and the Office of the Director, which provide a wide variety of national and international weather guidance products to National Weather Service field offices, government agencies, emergency managers, private sector meteorologists, and meteorological organizations and societies throughout the world. NCEP is a critical national resource in national and global weather prediction. NCEP is the starting point for nearly all weather forecasts in the United States. The Centers are: Aviation Weather Center (AWC), Climate Prediction Center (CPC), Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), NCEP Central Operations (NCO), National Hurricane Center (NHC), Ocean Prediction Center (OPC), Storm Prediction Center (SPC), Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), Weather Prediction Center (WPC)
LAADS DAAC is the web interface to the Level 1 and Atmosphere Archive and Distribution System (LAADS). The mission of LAADS is to provide quick and easy access to MODIS Level 1, Atmosphere and Land data products, VIIRS Level 1 and Land data products MAS and MERIS data products. MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites.
The Global Carbon Atlas is an online platform to explore, visualize and interpret global and regional carbon data arising from both human activities and natural processes. The graphics and data sources are made available in the belief that their wide dissemination will lead to new knowledge and better-informed decisions to limit and cope with human-induced climate change. The Global Carbon Atlas is a community effort under the umbrella of the Global Carbon Project based on the contributions of many research institutions and individual scientists around the world who make available observations, models, and interpretation skills.
The projects include airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, social science surveys, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the BAOBAB data portal enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that have been collected by operational networks since 1850, long term monitoring research networks and intensive scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Data documentation complies with metadata international standards, and data are delivered into standard formats. The data request interface takes full advantage of the database relational structure and enables users to elaborate multicriteria requests (period, area, property…).
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The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
The twin GRACE satellites were launched on March 17, 2002. Since that time, the GRACE Science Data System (SDS) has produced and distributed estimates of the Earth gravity field on an ongoing basis. These estimates, in conjunction with other data and models, have provided observations of terrestrial water storage changes, ice-mass variations, ocean bottom pressure changes and sea-level variations. This portal, together with PODAAC, is responsible for the distribution of the data and documentation for the GRACE project.
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As the third center for oceanography of the World Data Center following WDC-A of the United States and WDC-B of Russia, WDC-D for oceanography boasts long-term and stable sources of domestic marine basic data. The State Oceanic Administration now has long-term observations obtained from the fixed coastal ocean stations, offshore and oceanic research vessels, moored and drifting buoys. More and more marine data have been available from the Chinese-foreign marine cooperative surveys, analysis and measurement of laboratory samples, reception by the satellite ground station, aerial telemeter and remote sensing, the GOOS program and global ships of opportunity reports, etc; More marine data are being and will be obtained from the ongoing “863” program, one of the state key projects during the Ninth Five-year plan and the seasat No 1 which is scheduled to be launched next year. Through many years’ effort, the WDC-D for oceanography has established formal relationship of marine data exchange with over 130 marine institutions in more than 60 countries in the world and is maintaining a close relationship of data exchange with over 30 major national oceanographic data centers. The established China Oceanic Information Network has joined the international marine data exchange system via Internet. Through these channels, a large amount data have been acquired of through international exchange, which, plus the marine data collected at home for many years, has brought the WDC-D for Oceanography over 100 years’ global marine data with a total data amounting to more than 10 billion bytes. In the meantime, a vast amount of work has been done in the standardized and normalized processing and management of the data, and a series of national and professional standards have been formulated and implemented successively. Moreover, appropriate standards and norms are being formulated as required.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search https://search.earthdata.nasa.gov/. The capabilities of EOSDIS constituting the EOSDIS Science Operations are managed by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The capabilities include: generation of higher level (Level 1-4) science data products for several satellite missions; archiving and distribution of data products from Earth observation satellite missions, as well as aircraft and field measurement campaigns. The EOSDIS science operations are performed within a distributed system of many interconnected nodes - Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), and distributed, discipline-specific, Earth science Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) with specific responsibilities for production, archiving, and distribution of Earth science data products. The DAACs serve a large and diverse user community by providing capabilities to search and access science data products and specialized services.
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a new data archive for Earth and environmental science data. ESS-DIVE is funded by the Data Management program within the Climate and Environmental Science Division under the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research program (BER), and is maintained by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. ESS-DIVE will archive and publicly share data obtained from observational, experimental, and modeling research that is funded by the DOE’s Office of Science under its Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) programs within the Environmental Systems Science (ESS) activity. ESS-DIVE will include CDIAC that closed September 30, 2017. >>>!!!<<< March 2018: Some of the CDIAC data has not yet been transferred to ESS-DIVE. Click here http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ to check the CDIAC transition website. >>>!!!<<< The new archive for the CDIAC data will be ESS-DIVE except in the specific cases mentioned below: The Oceanic Trace Gas data have been transitioned to the new Ocean Carbon Data System (OCADS) operated by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) at https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/ocads/. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) data have been transitioned to Caltech (http://tccondata.org/). HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) data are transitioning to the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory (https://www.eol.ucar.edu/data-software). - ESS-DIVE launched in July 2017, and is currently in the process of implementing a new archive designed to provide long-term stewardship and use of data from observational, experimental and modeling activities in the DOE in the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Programs in the Environmental System Science (ESS) activity.