Filter

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 14 result(s)
Content type(s)
Country
BaAMPs is the first database dedicated to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) specifically tested against microbial biofilms. The aim of this project is to provide useful resources for the study of AMPs against biofilms to microbiologist, bioinformatics researcher and medical scientist working in this field in an open-access framework.
The Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD) was originally created by a graduate student, Zhe Wang, as his master's thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Guangshun Wang. The project was initiated in 2002 and the first version of the database was open to the public in August 2003. It contained 525 peptide entries, which can be searched in multiple ways, including APD ID, peptide name, amino acid sequence, original location, PDB ID, structure, methods for structural determination, peptide length, charge, hydrophobic content, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, and hemolytic activity. Some results of this bioinformatics tool were reported in the 2004 database paper. The peptide data stored in the APD were gleaned from the literature (PubMed, PDB, Google, and Swiss-Prot) manually in over a decade.
Country
>>>>!!<<<< As stated 2017-11-23 the database is not available anymore >>>>!!<<<< ACEpepDB is a database ran by the Central Food Technological Research Institute. It contains records of about 865 peptides. Each record provides information on the food source, preparation, purification and any other additional information. Each record includes the reference(s). The database provides a search and browsing option for a more personalized research experience.
Country
The Global Proteome Machine (GPM) is a protein identification database. This data repository allows users to post and compare results. GPM's data is provided by contributors like The Informatics Factory, University of Michigan, and Pacific Northwestern National Laboratories. The GPM searchable databases are: GPMDB, pSYT, SNAP, MRM, PEPTIDE and HOT.
BioMagResBank (BMRB) is the publicly-accessible depository for NMR results from peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids recognized by the International Society of Magnetic Resonance and by the IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB Inter-Union Task Group on the Standardization of Data Bases of Protein and Nucleic Acid Structures Determined by NMR Spectroscopy. In addition, BMRB provides reference information and maintains a collection of NMR pulse sequences and computer software for biomolecular NMR
Country
BACTIBASE contains calculated or predicted physicochemical properties of bacteriocins produced by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The information in this database is very easy to extract and allows rapid prediction of relationships structure/function and target organisms of these peptides and therefore better exploitation of their biological activity in both the medical and food sectors.
The database aims to bridge the gap between agent repositories and studies documenting the effect of antimicrobial combination therapies. Most notably, our primary aim is to compile data on the combination of antimicrobial agents, namely natural products such as AMP. To meet this purpose, we have developed a data curation workflow that combines text mining, manual expert curation and graph analysis and supports the reconstruction of AMP-Drug combinations.
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
SWATHAtlas is a repository of mass spectrometry data of the human proteome. The repository provides open access to libraries of SWATH-MS (Sequential Windowed Acquisition of All Theoretical Fragment Ion Mass Spectra) datasets. SWATH-MS is a method which combines both data-independent acquisition (DIA) and targeted data analysis techniques for the collection and storage of fragmentation spectra of peptides. Compared to techniques of selected reaction monitoring (SRM), SWATH-MS allows for a more extensive throughput of proteins in a sample to be targeted. The spectra collected in SWATHAtlas can be interpreted with the help of software such as OpenSWATH or Peakview.
Country
A human interactome map. The sequencing of the human genome has provided a surprisingly small number of genes, indicating that the complex organization of life is not reflected in the gene number but, rather, in the gene products – that is, in the proteins. These macromolecules regulate the vast majority of cellular processes by their ability to communicate with each other and to assemble into larger functional units. Therefore, the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions is fundamental for the understanding of protein function, cellular processes and, ultimately, the complexity of life. Moreover, interactome maps are particularly needed to link new proteins to disease pathways and the identification of novel drug targets.
The ChemBio Hub vision is to provide the tools that will make it easier for Oxford University scientists to connect with colleagues to improve their research, to satisfy funders that the data they have paid for is being managed according to their policies, and to make new alliances with pharma and biotech partners. Funding and development of the ChemBio Hub was ending on the 30th June 2016. Please be reassured that the ChemBio Hub system and all your data will continue to be secured on the SGC servers for the foreseeable future. You can continue to use the services as normal. More information see: http://staging.chembiohub.ox.ac.uk/blog/
Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is a freely available dictionary of 'small molecular entities'. The term 'molecular entity' encompasses any constitutionally or isotopically distinct atom, molecule, ion, ion pair, radical, radical ion, complex, conformer, etc., identifiable as a separately distinguishable entity. The molecular entities in question are either products of nature or synthetic products used to intervene in the processes of living organisms (either deliberately, as for drugs, or unintentionally', as for chemicals in the environment). The qualifier 'small' implies the exclusion of entities directly encoded by the genome, and thus as a rule nucleic acids, proteins and peptides derived from proteins by cleavage are not included.
The PeptideAtlas validates expressed proteins to provide eukaryotic genome data. Peptide Atlas provides data to advance biological discoveries in humans. The PeptideAtlas accepts proteomic data from high-throughput processes and encourages data submission.