Filter

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 23 result(s)
NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) holds Earth science data set and service descriptions, which cover subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. The project mission is to assist researchers, policy makers, and the public in the discovery of and access to data, related services, and ancillary information (which includes descriptions of instruments and platforms) relevant to global change and Earth science research. Within this mission, the directory also offers online authoring tools to providers of data and services, facilitating the capability to make their products available to the Earth science community.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
Country
Global Change Research Data Publishing and Repository (GCdataPR) is an open data infrastructure on earth science, particular on the global environmental changes. The GCdataPR’ management policies following the international common understanding to the data sharing principles and guidelines is the key to make the qualified data publishing and sharing smoothly and successfully. The data management policies including dataset submission for publishing policy, peer review policy data quality control policy data long-term preservation policy, data sharing policy, 10% rule for identify original dataset policy, claim discovery with both data and paper policy, and data service statistics policy.
The IRI/LDEO Climate Data Library is a collection of climate data sets with the focus of climate change monitoring and mitigation. Browse data by category and source, navigate and analyze datasets using maps, and the Ingrid Data Analysis Language. The IRI/LDEO also includes web tutorials.
The SAEON Data Portal provides meta-data-driven search and discovery facilities, and also serves as a repository for data contributed by stakeholders and providers.
The National Oceanographic Data Center includes the National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC) and the NOAA Central Library, which are integrated to provide access to the world's most comprehensive sources of marine environmental data and information. NODC maintains and updates a national ocean archive with environmental data acquired from domestic and foreign activities and produces products and research from these data which help monitor global environmental changes. These data include physical, biological and chemical measurements derived from in situ oceanographic observations, satellite remote sensing of the oceans, and ocean model simulations. >>>!!!<<< For informations about the migration of data from NODC to NCEI see: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/about/index.html >>>!!!<<<
Paleoclimatology data are derived from natural sources such as tree rings, ice cores, corals, and ocean and lake sediments. These proxy climate data extend the archive of weather and climate information hundreds to millions of years. The data include geophysical or biological measurement time series and some reconstructed climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. NCEI provides the paleoclimatology data and information scientists need to understand natural climate variability and future climate change. We also operate the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, which archives and distributes data contributed by scientists around the world.
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
TemperateReefBase is a resource for temperate reef researchers worldwide to use and contribute data. Unique in its role as a one-stop-shop for global temperate reef data, TemperateReefBase was initially established by IMAS in collaboration with the Kelp Ecology Ecosystem Network (KEEN). KEEN was instigated through a National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group which assembled experts from around the world to examine the impacts of global change on kelp-bed ecosystem worldwide. The group has assembled significant global data for kelps, other seaweeds and associated species including fishes, and has embarked on unprecedented global experiments and surveys in which identical experiments and surveys are being conducted at sites in kelp beds around the world to determine global trends and examine the capacity of kelps to respond to disturbance in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is an online discovery interface showcasing temperate reef data collected from around the globe. The portal aims to make this data freely and openly available for the benefit of marine and environmental science as a whole. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is hosted and maintained by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, Australia.
The USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from local to global scales, and in both domestic and international settings. The USGS through the Land Cover Institute serves as a facilitator for land cover and land use science, applications, and production functions. The institute assists in the availability and technical support of land cover data sets through increasing public and scientific awareness of the importance of land cover science. LCI continues, after the reorganization of the World Data Centers in 2009, serving as the World Data Center (WDC) for land cover data for access to, or information about, land cover data of the world
WorldClim is a set of global climate layers (climate grids) with a spatial resolution of about 1 square kilometer. The data can be used for mapping and spatial modeling in a GIS or with other computer programs.
Content type(s)
Country
MISTRALS database is a distributed system, that enables users to access datasets produced by all the projects (ChArMEx, HyMeX, MERMex, TerMex, CORSiCA, EMSO and MOOSE) and stored in different data centres. MISTRALS (Mediterranean Integrated STudies at Regional And Local Scales) is a decennial program for systematic observations and research dedicated to the understanding of the Mediterranean Basin environmental process under the planet global change. It aims to coordinate, across the Mediterranean Basin, interdisciplinary research on atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and paleo-climate, including environmental ecology and social sciences. The objective is to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms shaping and influencing landscape, environment and human impact of this eco-region.
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
On February 24, 2000, Terra began collecting what will ultimately become a new, 15-year global data set on which to base scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Together with the entire fleet of EOS spacecraft, Terra is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change. TERRA's data collection instruments include: Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
CARIBIC is an innovative scientific project to study and monitor important chemical and physical processes in the Earth´s atmosphere. Detailed and extensive measurements are made during long distance flights. We deploy an airfreight container with automated scientific apparatus which are connected to an air and particle (aerosol) inlet underneath the aircraft. We use an Airbus A340-600 from Lufthansa since December 2004.
The Centre’s vision is a rural transformation in the developing world as smallholder households strategically increase their use of trees in agricultural landscapes to improve their food security, nutrition, income, health, shelter, social cohesion, energy resources and environmental sustainability. The Centre’s mission is to generate science-based knowledge about the diverse roles that trees play in agricultural landscapes, and to use its research to advance policies and practices, and their implementation, that benefit the poor and the environment.
Country
DIAS aims at collecting and storing earth observation data; analyzing such data in combination with socio-economic data, and converting data into information useful for crisis management with respect to global-scale environmental disasters, and other threats; and to make this information available within Japan and overseas.